Fungus On Skin Around Fingernails

Nail fungus or onychomycosis is an infection of the nails occurring both on the hands and feet but certainly more prevalent on the feet due to the environment that feet find themselves in. Nail fungus generally thrive in dark, moist environments, so when you consider wearing shoes and socks all day along with perspiration that occurs, it end up being a perfect growth media for nail fungus.

The true, tough to get rid of nail fungus, actually grows underneath the nail. As it grows, it forces the nail up off the nail bed and the nail becomes thick, crumbly and discolored ranging in color from yellow to brown. There may also be an odor. It is not uncommon for these infected nails to then spread to the remaining healthy nails on the foot. It is also not uncommon for nails to fall off and unfortunately, in most cases grow back the same way if not properly treated.

Aside from the unsightly appearance of the nail fungus, other problems can arise. Having nail fungus makes most people more prone to developing athlete s foot of the skin. (The opposite also holds true). Additionally, thick fungal nails can be uncomfortable in closed shoes as they feel like rocks underneath the top of the shoe. These infections can make people more susceptible to secondary bacterial infections as they exacerbate the formation of ingrown nails, plus the sheer distortion of the nails tends to irritate the healthy skin of the adjacent toes causing abrasions that can become infected. This is especially dangerous in people who suffer from diabetes or have poor circulation.

Treatment can be difficult because of the fact that fungus thrives in dark moist environments . Eliminating those factors can go a long way to reducing recurrence.

Many patients ask me if the infected nail has to be removed. The only time I remove them is if they are already partially loose. If the mycotic nail is adhered to the nail bed I no longer advocate removal of the nail because the simple truth is, just removing a nail all the way back to its growth plate will cause the nail to grow out with a degree of thickness even if there is no fungus present.

There are both oral and topical medication treatments. The gold standard for treating onychomycosis in an otherwise healthy individual is the oral therapy. The most widely prescribed medication today is Lamisil tablets (Novartis), although there are certainly other oral antifungals that can be used. The newer generation of oral antifungals is very safe medications if properly used. Your doctor may prescribe one or two blood tests during the course of therapy to make sure there are no adverse effects. Additionally, your doctor should take a sampling of the nail and have it tested to confirm that it is true nail fungus. Visual inspection is not the proper way to make a diagnosis. Many times what appears to be fungus is nothing more than a hyperkeratinization of the nail bed, which is a thickening and distortion of the nail. This may lead to fungus but in itself is not treated with an antifungal medication either orally or topically.

Although topical treatments are available, they tend to be less effective. The main problem, as stated earlier, is that fungus grows underneath the nail; so applying medication to the top of the nail becomes an effort in futility. Trying to force the medication underneath the nail rarely works.

The best way to use topical medication is to see a foot specialist who will grind down and cut away as much of the diseased nail as possible (a painless procedure), so that the topical medication will penetrate to the live fungus more readily. This can become a tedious process as the medication generally has to be applied twice a day by the patient, (being lazy about it defeats the whole purpose) and then the nail has to be ground down on a regular basis. The other problem is that depending on the degree of fungus this process can take upwards of a year. Another problem is that the greater the number of nails that are infected, the less the likelihood of clearing them all up with the topical medication. Having said that, I have seen some very gratifying results with topical medication.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How can I get fingernails that are sleek and healthy and just look really nice?
    I've bitten my fingernails my whole life. I've just broken the habit because I can't bite with my braces.
    Since I just stopped, they're still kind of short. How can I take care of them? Are there any good procedures to make my nails look really nice? I would love to have any help!

    • ANSWER:
      Biotin
      Biotin deficiencies may lead to brittle or split nails. Increasing your intake of biotin helps to increase your actual nail thickness by about 25%, according to a study done in Switzerland. You can find naturally-occurring biotin in egg yolks, yeast, cauliflower, lentils, milk, soybeans, and peanut butter.

      Protein
      Nails are made of keratin, a protein which also forms teeth, hair, and skin. Without enough protein, your nails are weakened and split easily. Aim for eight ounces of protein a day. The best sources are fish, chicken, red meat, eggs, tempeh, lentils, quinoa, and almond butter.

      Calcium
      Calcium isn't just for your bones. Without sufficient calcium, your nails will grow brittle and your cuticles may look ragged. Try getting 1200 milligrams a day; the best natural sources are spinach, turnip greens, collard greens, and mustard greens. Dairy products are also full of calcium, but have less nutrients than greens.

      Fatty Acids
      To turn brittle nails into strong, glowing ones, make sure your diet includes sufficient omega-3 fatty acids. Eat a combination of wild salmon (farmed salmon won't have the rich omega-3s), walnuts, soybeans, broccoli, olive oil, pumpkin seeds, cabbage, and squash. Flaxseeds are the best vegan source of omega-3s around. You can also take evening primrose oil or fish oil supplements.

      Vitamin B12
      If your fingernails break easily or look discolored, you may not be getting enough vitamin B12 in your diet. This supplement is absolutely vital for healthy nails, and is found it in meat, eggs, and dairy products. Unfortunately, there is no safe source of vitamin B12 from plants, but many vegan products are fortified with it, including textured vegetable protein and cereals.

      Zinc
      White spots on fingernails indicate a zinc deficiency. Many women become temporarily zinc deficient before menstruation, and this may show up in their nails. Zinc is found in most protein-rich foods, such as meat, dairy, eggs, and fish. For vegans, the best source of zinc is pumpkin seeds.

      Silica
      Fragile, slow-growing nails may be an indicator of silica deficiency. This mineral comes from the earth's crust, and is necessary for nail, hair, and bone health. You can find it in herbs such as horsetail, nettle, and oatstraw. Make a tea from these herbs by boiling water slowly, on a low temperature, so that the vital minerals aren't lost through the steam.

      Hope This Helps And Dont Go Back To Bitting You Nails...Theres So Much Bacteria .. My Auntie Got A Tape Worm From Doing It.

      And Whatever You Do, Dont EVER Get Acrilicke Nails.
      I Work At A Spa And I've Seen Horror Movie Worthy Nails From That. Gel Doesnt Stain Yellow, It Doesnt Permit Fungus To Grow In Your Nail Bed And It Looks Nicer..

      Good Luck !

  2. QUESTION:
    How can I cure peeling fingernails?
    For some months my fingernails have been deteriorating. Several of them have cracked from top to bottom and then have peeled away from the crack. Also they have become ridged from top to bottom. They are not brittle. This problem is gradually spreading to the rest of my fingernails.
    I never wear nail varnish and use masses of a good quality nail and hand cream every day.
    I suspect this may be due to a mineral or vitamin deficioncy of some sort.
    Does anyone have any suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      1. Protect your nails from water. Wear cotton-lined, rubber gloves when doing household chores, such as washing dishes. Between uses, turn rubber gloves inside-out to dry to prevent germs from growing in them.
      2. Apply moisturizing lotion to your nails, especially the skin around the nail, after exposure to water. Even a minor cut alongside your nail can allow bacteria or fungi to enter and cause an infection.
      3. Wear gloves in cold weather and during activities that might harm nails, such as gardening.
      4. Keep your nails short to prevent breakage. Trim your nails only when they're well-hydrated so they'll be less brittle when clipping. File nails in only one direction not back and forth, which also can split nails.
      5. Moisturize your nails after using nail polish remover, which dries your nails. Look for an acetone-free formulation.
      6. Don't push back or cut the cuticles, which protect new nail growth.
      7. Don't pick at hangnails. Instead, clip them close to the skin surface with sharp, clean cuticle scissors.

      The moisturizers that contain alpha-hydroxy acid or
      lactic acid such as Lac-Hydrin, help the most especially when applied at
      bedtime and then putting on a glove or cotton sock so the moisturizer
      doesn't rub off as easily. Also, B complex vitamins or specifically Biotin
      (2.5mg/day and no more) may help.

      Good luck!

  3. QUESTION:
    What is the cause of an odd fingernail abnormality?
    A thumbnail has a vertical gouged-out place on it about a fourth of an inch long and a sixteenth of an inch wide. It doesn't go all the way through to the skin, but it is deep and noticeable. The fingernail flattens out around it. Elsewhere on the same thumbnail, it has horizontal dips and ridges. Other fingernails are normal. For about two years these odd changes have been appearing on this thumbnail. They start at the base of the nail and gets worse at is grows.

    • ANSWER:
      It could be a case of psoriasis of the nails. Psoriasis can effect any or all parts of the body on the outside as well as inside such as the mouth.
      It could also be a nail fungus that grows under the nails. I suggest seeing a dermatologist and seek his opinion on a treatment. I cant see why it would start doing this spontaneously for no reason whatsoever. There has to be some stimulus or conditon.
      Hope you the best with finding out what this is and its treatment.

  4. QUESTION:
    What are home remedies for growing long healthy nails?
    Need easy home remedies!!! I have stubby nails and I bite my thumb and it's skin a lot!!! I beg, please help.

    • ANSWER:
      Long nails tip 1: Don't use your nails as tools

      Rather than using your nails use other parts of your hand, or a pen, to perform tasks like dialing the phone. Don't pick, poke or scrape with your nails and especially avoid opening soft drink cans with your nails.

      Long nails tip 2: Wear gloves

      Detergents are particularly harsh on your nails and can cause splitting and peeling. Wear gloves when washing dishes or cleaning. You should also wear gloves when gardening to protect your nails from infection and prevent dryness, damage, and loss of natural oils.

      Long nails tip 3: Don't bit your nails or pick at your cuticles

      Aside from the obvious reason of biting shortening your nails these habits can damage the nail bed. Even a minor cut alongside your nail can allow bacteria or fungi to enter the nail bed and cause an infection. Remember your nails grow slowly so an injured nail retains signs of damage for several months.

      Long nails tip 4: Look after your cuticles

      The cuticle is a barrier that keeps bacteria from the nail matrix, where new cells are generated, so it should not be cut or trimmed. On the other hand you do want to keep cuticles from becoming overgrown, which suffocates nail growth. If your cuticle has grown out on to the nail plate, after sufficiently softening your cuticles in warm water, very gently use a cuticle pusher to push your cuticles back. As well as pushing your cuticles back this will help to remove dead skin and debris that may have accumulated. Hold the cuticle pusher at an angle, and use tiny circular movements, so that you are as gentle and careful as possible and do not damage the cuticle. When you have finished doesn't forget to moisturize your hands.

      Long nails tip 5: Look after your nails

      Trim fingernails and clean under the nails regularly. Use manicure scissors or clippers and a nail file to smooth nail edges. Never pull off hangnails - doing so almost always results in ripping living tissue. Clip hangnails off, leaving a slight angle outward.

      Long nails tip 6: Caring for brittle nails

      Trim brittle nails after a bath, or a 15 minute hand soak in bath oil, and then apply a moisturiser. Don't use nail polish remover more than twice a month. Instead, touch up the nail polish. When you do need to use a nail polish remover avoid those that use acetone, which dries out nails. Also consider using a nail strengthener and growth formula.

      Long nails tip 7: The role of diet

      Unless your diet is deficient in protein and vitamins dietary changes that supposedly strengthen nails won't work. Your nails can however offer telltale signs of dietary problems such as: Lack of vitamin A and calcium causing dryness and brittleness. Lack of protein, folic acid and vitamin C causing hang nails White bands across the nails caused by protein deficiency. A lack of sufficient hydrochloric acid causing splitting nails. Insufficient intake of vitamin B12 leading to excessive dryness, very rounded and curved ends and darkening of nails. Insufficient zinc causing development of white spots on the nails. Red skin around your cuticles can be caused by poor metabolism of essential fatty acids.

      If you are concerned that your diet may not be balanced and healthy you should consult a medical or nutritional professional.

      Long nails tip 8: Moisturise your nails

      Nails need moisture just like your hands do. Rub lotion into your nails when moisturising your hands. Be sure to apply moisturiser each time you wash your hands.

      Long nails tip 9: Use coloured nail polish

      Use coloured nail polish while you are growing your nails. If you prefer a softer look, try a sheer shade. Coloured nail polish helps you become more aware of your hands and how to use them in a way that keeps your nail polish undamaged and hence your nails protected. It also makes chips easier to spot so that you can make immediate repairs.

      Long, beautiful natural nails take commitment and special care to grow and maintain. Be patient, the average nail takes 3 to 6 months to grow.

  5. QUESTION:
    Can you put an acrylic nail on a regrowing nail?
    One of my fingernails semi-died and now it's about 75% back. Can I put an acrylic on it without killing the whole thing?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes you can; however!

      Putting acrylic on a nail will not affect the regrowth unless you were allergic to the acrylic and then you would perhaps get some type of allergic reaction such as contact dermatitis or paronychia (inflammation of the eponychium ((skin))) around the nail.
      Or
      You get acrylic on the nail and you get a nail fungus because of moisture trapped in between the product and your healthy (living) nail or moisture inside the nail plate (your nail).
      Or
      You get acrylic on the nail and get a bacterial infection due to not being sanitary enough. This is due to not disinfecting hands, equipment, files etc. before acrylic nail service.

      My suggestion not recommendation (because I am no Physician) would be to go to your Nail Technician and have them look at it to make sure there are no signs of infection.
      IF signs of infection: They will refer you to your physician.
      If NO signs of infection: Then the nail tech most likely will try to file away as much of the dead nail that is possible without affecting the nail bed ( skin underneath the nail plate). The tech can then put an artificial nail enhancement (tip, sculpt) to the nail to match it to the length of the other nails. This will help the natural nail as it grows out.

      If you do not have a Nail Tech you normally go to, then ask around for a reputable and sanitary tech to go to and make sure you observe their work area and whether they are using clean implements (file, nipper, etcc) on each client. Also make sure that the tech does not try to put product on your skin (the skin where the rest of your nail should be) if you decide to go with a sculpt. The sculpt should always be attached to the natural nail.

      Hope this helps.

  6. QUESTION:
    What causes fingernails to turn yellow?
    I'm a boy so nail polish is out of the question. Just recently they've turned a yellow tint around the tops but are better now?

    • ANSWER:
      Fungus! I once knew someone who had it under their fingernail and frankly it was digusting.
      It was all yellow, dry, cracked and whatnot...
      Lol sorry for the mental image lmaoo..

      Anyways if it gets worse try putting vinegar on it, it kills it.
      But since you said it's better now I guess you won't need to do that unless it comes back.

      Also, try researching it.(Google)
      You'd be surpirised what you can find out.

      -Glenda

      Edit..
      Try these:

      http://www.handresearch.com/news/yellow-fingernails-causes-remedies.htm

      http://beyondjane.com/beauty/skin/what-causes-yellow-fingernails-and-what-you-can-do-about-them/

      ^This one is kind of the same as the first but try it anyway.

      http://www.everydayhealth.com/info/v1/What%20Causes%20Yellow%20Nails?xid=g_dlp_v1&s_kwcid=TC|6122|what%20causes%20yellow%20nails||S||4434204762&gclid=CK7y6ae3_58CFY6F7QodNQ_mkQ

      The list of websites on this topic goes on and on, so as I said before, just do some research. :]

      -Glenda

  7. QUESTION:
    How do you make your nails grow faster?
    I have a friend that is constantly biting her nails, she is ready to quit the habit and wants some suggestions. (I am her go-to gal)

    • ANSWER:
      Long nails tip 1: Don't use your nails as tools.
      Rather than using your nails use other parts of your hand, or a pen, to perform tasks like dialing the phone. Don't pick, poke or scrape with your nails and especially avoid opening soft drink cans with your nails.

      Long nails tip 2: Wear gloves.
      Detergents are particularly harsh on your nails and can cause splitting and peeling. Wear gloves when washing dishes or cleaning. You should also wear gloves when gardening to protect your nails from infection and prevent dryness, damage, and loss of natural oils.

      Long nails tip 3: Don't bit your nails or pick at your cuticles.
      Aside from the obvious reason of biting shortening your nails these habits can damage the nail bed. Even a minor cut alongside your nail can allow bacteria or fungi to enter the nail bed and cause an infection. Remember your nails grow slowly so an injured nail retains signs of damage for several months.

      Long nails tip 4: Look after your cuticles.
      The cuticle is a barrier that keeps bacteria from the nail matrix, where new cells are generated, so it should not be cut or trimmed. On the other hand you do want to keep cuticles from becoming overgrown, which suffocates nail growth. If your cuticle has grown out on to the nail plate, after sufficiently softening your cuticles in warm water, very gently use a cuticle pusher to push your cuticles back. As well as pushing your cuticles back this will help to remove dead skin and debris that may have accumulated. Hold the cuticle pusher at an angle, and use tiny circular movements, so that you are as gentle and careful as possible and do not damage the cuticle. When you have finished doesn't forget to moisturize your hands.

      Long nails tip 5: Look after your nails.
      Trim fingernails and clean under the nails regularly. Use manicure scissors or clippers and a nail file to smooth nail edges. Never pull off hangnails - doing so almost always results in ripping living tissue. Clip hangnails off, leaving a slight angle outward.

      Long nails tip 6: Caring for brittle nails.
      Trim brittle nails after a bath, or a 15 minute hand soak in bath oil, and then apply a moisturiser. Don't use nail polish remover more than twice a month. Instead, touch up the nail polish. When you do need to use a nail polish remover avoid those that use acetone, which dries out nails. Also consider using a nail strengthener and growth formula.

      Long nails tip 7: The role of diet.
      Unless your diet is deficient in protein and vitamins dietary changes that supposedly strengthen nails won't work. Your nails can however offer telltale signs of dietary problems such as:
      Lack of vitamin A and calcium causing dryness and brittleness.
      Lack of protein, folic acid and vitamin C causing hang nails
      White bands across the nails caused by protein deficiency.
      A lack of sufficient hydrochloric acid causing splitting nails.
      Insufficient intake of vitamin B12 leading to excessive dryness, very rounded and curved ends and darkening of nails.
      Insufficient zinc causing development of white spots on the nails.
      Red skin around your cuticles can be caused by poor metabolism of essential fatty acids.

      welll hope this helped(was it goodinuff to make the best answer lol please)

  8. QUESTION:
    How can I get my nails to really be healthy and grow?
    They're always peeling and my cuticles are always so dry.

    • ANSWER:
      The condition of nails reflect the quality of tissue production in the body as nails are considered to be the waste product of bones (asthi dhatu) Healthy nails are pink,smooth and evenly shaped. Healthy nails are often a sign of good health, while bad nails are often a tip off to more serious problems. Dermatologists say healthy nails are an important part of overall health. The steps in cultivating and maintaining healthy nails are quite simple.

      Many less than desirable nail conditions can be avoided through proper care, but some actually indicate an illness that requires attention. But a little basic nail care can go a long way to keeping your nails in healthy condition. Keep nails on the shorter side, which are easier to care for. Soak toenails if they are thick or difficult to cut, if you are diabetic, you may need a health care professional to help with trimming diseased nails. Like a great new haircut or a terrific skin care regimen, healthy,well-manicured nails are an integral part of a neat, pulled-together appearance- one that can work as an asset in both the social and the business world.

      There are several nail problems that are caused due to hereditary factors, lack of proper care, negligence and vitamin and protein deficiencies in your diet. After diet, stress is the next important factor causing nail problems. Minerals, calcium, vitamins all are the essential components of our balanced diet. Consume a high fiber diet with plenty of green leafy vegetables and reduce your weight if you are overweight. If you are concerned that your diet may not be balanced and healthy you should consult a medical or nutritional professional.

      Toenails are a great indicator of the health of your feet. Toenails of people of all ages can undergo a range of changes, some of which are relatively common. Major toenail problem culprits are incorrectly fitting shoes, which press too tightly on the toenails. The main nutritional tip of nail care is to acquire plenty of vitamins such as vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin B12, as all these works on your finger and toenails. The fungi that cause onychomycosis affect the toenails about four times more often than fingernails and, like many organisms that cause disease, they grow where it's warm and moist. Most often, nail fungus appears in the toenails because socks and shoes keep the toenails dark, warm, and moist.

      Also nails can reveal a lot about the body's internal health like healthy nails are often a sign of good health that may require high protein diet while bad nails often shows sign of serious health problems. Toenail fungus is a living organism that thrives in dark, damp environments such as under and around nails. Nail Fungus is a tough condition to have, not only it damages your nail, but it is also an embarrassing problem that affects around 13% of people across America. Nail fungus is more popular among old adults for several reasons, including decreased blood circulation, much years of vulnerability to fungi and because nails may rise more slowly and thicken with aging, making them more vulnerable to transmission. Having realistic expectations about how long it will take to get rid of nail fungus is as important as following your doctor's instructions. In our view, Zeta Clear is the first and best option for natural nail fungus treatment.

      There are many natural remedies and supplements, which can be helpful for you to give natural nail care. These are some of the vitamins and proteins which can be helpful for you to get healthy nail care. There are many Herbal care products in the market, which ensures healthy nails. Zeta Clear Nail Care includes the concentrated essence of a substance, which creates a relieving effect on our nails and toes and brings about the desired effect. Apply the Zeta Clear with brush applicator to affected nail three times per day as or as your health care provide suggests.

  9. QUESTION:
    Are my fingernails permanently ruined?
    I've bit my nails off and on for as long as I can remember because I have always had anxiety. However, this past year it got really bad because school made me extremely panic-y and anxious. I bite my nails and the skin around them constantly. They don't really bleed usually, but they look terrible. One nail in particular I somehow managed to peel a whole layer off the top and now it's really lumpy. My cuticles are really inflamed, especially on my left hand. My mom says I've permanently ruined my nails, that they will never look normal, and that I probably have fingernail fungus starting. I tried painting my nails, using a stress ball, etc but nothing works.

    • ANSWER:

  10. QUESTION:
    How do I get my nails to grow long?
    i have been biting my nails for a long time and now i decided to stop and let my nails grow out!
    WILL YOU PLEASE ANSWER AND ME KNOW!!

    • ANSWER:
      Long nails tip 1: Don't use your nails as tools.

      Rather than using your nails use other parts of your hand, or a pen, to perform tasks like dialing the phone. Don't pick, poke or scrape with your nails and especially avoid opening soft drink cans with your nails.

      Long nails tip 2: Wear gloves.

      Detergents are particularly harsh on your nails and can cause splitting and peeling. Wear gloves when washing dishes or cleaning. You should also wear gloves when gardening to protect your nails from infection and prevent dryness, damage, and loss of natural oils.

      Long nails tip 3: Don't bit your nails or pick at your cuticles.

      Aside from the obvious reason of biting shortening your nails these habits can damage the nail bed. Even a minor cut alongside your nail can allow bacteria or fungi to enter the nail bed and cause an infection. Remember your nails grow slowly so an injured nail retains signs of damage for several months.

      Long nails tip 4: Look after your cuticles.

      The cuticle is a barrier that keeps bacteria from the nail matrix, where new cells are generated, so it should not be cut or trimmed. On the other hand you do want to keep cuticles from becoming overgrown, which suffocates nail growth. If your cuticle has grown out on to the nail plate, after sufficiently softening your cuticles in warm water, very gently use a cuticle pusher to push your cuticles back. As well as pushing your cuticles back this will help to remove dead skin and debris that may have accumulated. Hold the cuticle pusher at an angle, and use tiny circular movements, so that you are as gentle and careful as possible and do not damage the cuticle. When you have finished doesn't forget to moisturize your hands.

      Long nails tip 5: Look after your nails.

      Trim fingernails and clean under the nails regularly. Use manicure scissors or clippers and a nail file to smooth nail edges. Never pull off hangnails - doing so almost always results in ripping living tissue. Clip hangnails off, leaving a slight angle outward.

      Long nails tip 6: Caring for brittle nails.

      Trim brittle nails after a bath, or a 15 minute hand soak in bath oil, and then apply a moisturiser. Don't use nail polish remover more than twice a month. Instead, touch up the nail polish. When you do need to use a nail polish remover avoid those that use acetone, which dries out nails. Also consider using a nail strengthener and growth formula.

      Long nails tip 7: The role of diet.

      Unless your diet is deficient in protein and vitamins dietary changes that supposedly strengthen nails won't work. Your nails can however offer telltale signs of dietary problems such as:

      Lack of vitamin A and calcium causing dryness and brittleness.

      Lack of protein, folic acid and vitamin C causing hang nails

      White bands across the nails caused by protein deficiency.

      A lack of sufficient hydrochloric acid causing splitting nails.

      Insufficient intake of vitamin B12 leading to excessive dryness, very rounded and curved ends and darkening of nails.

      Insufficient zinc causing development of white spots on the nails.

      Red skin around your cuticles can be caused by poor metabolism of essential fatty acids.

      If you are concerned that your diet may not be balanced and healthy you should consult a medical or nutritional professional.

      Long nails tip 8: Moisturise your nails.

      Nails need moisture just like your hands do. Rub lotion into your nails when moisturising your hands. Be sure to apply moisturiser each time you wash your hands

      Long nails tip 9: Use coloured nail polish.

      Use coloured nail polish while you are growing your nails. If you prefer a softer look, try a sheer shade. Coloured nail polish helps you become more aware of your hands and how to use them in a way that keeps your nail polish undamaged and hence your nails protected. It also makes chips easier to spot so that you can make immediate repairs.

      Long, beautiful natural nails take commitment and special care to grow and maintain. Be patient, the average nail takes 3 to 6 months to grow.

      Hope this helps :)

  11. QUESTION:
    How do you get your nails healthy and long?
    My nails are like nubs I hate my nails so much is theirs way to like make them grow fast or anything to help me stop biting them?please help

    • ANSWER:
      For Healthy and Strong Nails
      Biting Nails
      Stop biting your fingernails or pick at cuticles. This may have a great impact for developing bacterial infection, which can transmit the infectious germs from your fingers to mouth. On the other hand biting can damage the skin around your finger leading to painful ingrown nails. Both are painful medical conditions that require prolonged treatment. Therefore, if you have a tendency to bite your nails dip them in some bitter substance or polish your fingernails to avoid doing so.

      Fake Nails
      Avoid acrylic fake fingernails, as they cause damage to your nails. Instead, simply get your own nails painted rather than having fake ones put on. It will help your nails stay healthy and help you avoid the damage.

      Trim Nails
      Frequent trimming and filing of nails encourage growth and keep them healthy. Using clippers, trim them straight across, with a gentle curve at the tip. Keep toenails clipped straight across and avoid clipping them in at the sides to prevent ingrown nails.

      File Nails
      Avoid filing your nails back and forth; instead file your nails in one direction only. Use a fine-textured emery board, since metal nail files are harsh on the nails.

      Cuticle Care
      Cuticles are often left untreated and neglected. However, the cuticles at the base of the nail are responsible for the health of our nails. Therefore, give a gentle massage to stimulate blood flow, enhance growth and prevent dryness and hangnails from developing.

      Clip Hangnails
      While pulling off hangnails there are chances of ripping off the live tissue along with the hangnail. Instead, carefully clip off hangnails.

      Nail polish
      Nail PolishMost women apply nail polish to make their nails attractive. A thin coat of clear nail polish can help retain moisture in your fingernails avoiding them from drying and eventually breaking. However, never skip base coat and always use good quality nail polish, manufactured by a renowned cosmetic company. Do not use cheap variety as they contain harmful chemicals that may permanently damage nails.

      Acetone/ Formaldehyde
      According to dermatologists, Nail polish removers containing acetone or formaldehyde make the nails terribly dry. Therefore, it is safe to use fragrance-free, acetate-based removers twice a month (only). Also remember to moisturize and massage your nails every time you use nail polish remover, to re-hydrate them and then apply nail polish. If nail polish peels off, instead of using a remover, reapply nail polish. .

      Nail Massage
      Massage your fingernails using natural oils like olive oil and castor oil so that they remain soft and well moisturized and healthy.

      Nail Moisturize
      Moisturizing fingernails help keep them hydrated and avoids causing brittleness. Smooth away dryness with a moisturizing hand cream containing collagen and vitamin E that are especially good for the nails. You can also massage the nails with jojoba oil especially after exposure of fingernails to water. Push the cuticles back first and then apply the moisturizer, rubbing it into the nail and skin around the nail.

      Personal Hygiene
      Maintain good personal hygiene to prevent bacteria and fungi from growing under the nails.

      Dry Hands
      Keep your hands dry. When hands are constantly in water, the nails become soft and brittle having a tendency to tear and break easily.

      Harsh Chemicals
      Detergents and other harsh chemicals that nails are exposed to, during various household activities can damage them. Wear protective cotton-lined vinyl gloves whenever you do household chores to avoid irritation and dryness.

      Winter Care
      When you go out during winter, wear gloves to protect your nails, as temperature during winter can make your nails dry and deteriorate...

  12. QUESTION:
    is ther any way to keep nail extentions looking nicer for longer?
    i always wear nail extentions which need infilling every 2 to 3 weeks . but the acrylic /gel starts coming up after about 1-1half weeks , has anyone got any tips on making them look just as nice till i get them infilled , maybe lotions or something ???

    • ANSWER:
      Hands and feet of women are showing femininity and nurturing. Feminine woman always be proud of palms with soft skin and manicured nails and perfect.

      Base, manicured nails is pretty healthy and strong nails. How to keep nails healthy and strong?

      For strong nails should keep intact the nail.
      Keep nails clean and dry.
      Avoid nail biting.
      Apply moisturizer on your nails every day. The cream prevents the splitting of the nails (regular hand lotion will do the job).
      No clear depth below the nail, thorough cleaning and too deep can cause infections.
      if you make sure to go manicure manicurist cares disinfect the dishes taken from a client. Nail fungus is very infectious.
      If you have artificial nails, check to see if the skin around the nails color changes. Skin discoloration indicates inflammation.
      Eat a balanced diet that contains the necessary vitamins and calcium and make sure to drink 15 glasses of water a day.

      How to achieve perfect nails and shiny?

      1. Please bring a professional Lmnicorstit weekly to receive treatment and beauty care cuticle. It is important to check in advance the institute and ensure a qualified and professional where the disinfection equipment in order to avoid clinging various diseases, especially onychomycosis.

      2. Must not be biting her nails.

      3. Apply hand cream twice a day quality.

      4. Peeling nail polish - not in any way! This might remove the top layer of the nail surface.

      5. Remove nail polish - nail polish remover will do all kinds or acetone.

      6. The moment a fragment or with the nail has to go right out and treat nail manicurist.

      7. If any of the artificial fingernail infection or stones should not tear or rip the building. If construction starts falling apart has come right manicurist.

      Perfectly manicured nails require a lot of work! And it's not cheap at all. You can cultivate your own nails at home with polish nails, clear nail polish, set Franchet home and polish remover.

  13. QUESTION:
    Do I need to dilute 100% tea tree oil before use?
    I have a small bottle of 100% pure tea tree oil and because it is at the maximum concentration, do I need to dilute before directly applying it to things like cuts and scrapes? If so, how should I dilute it properly?
    Also, any rude comments will be reported.

    • ANSWER:
      No, generally you do not need to dilute pure tea tree oil for cuts and scrapes.

      People with sensitive skin or who have allergies should test tea tree oil by applying a small amount to the inner arm. Any allergic reaction or irritation will manifest within a few minutes. Dilute the tea tree oil in an equal quantity of Olive oil or mix it with alcohol and water before trying another patch test. Allergic reactions to tea tree oil are unusual; reactions to diluted tea tree oil are rare. Discontinue use if allergic reaction occurs.

      Tea tree oil is applied to the skin (used topically) for infections such as acne, fungal infections of the nail (onychomycosis), lice, scabies, athlete s foot (tinea pedis), and ringworm. It is also used topically as a local antiseptic for cuts and abrasions, for burns, insect bites and stings, boils, vaginal infections, recurrent herpes labialis, toothache, infections of the mouth and nose, sore throat, and for ear infections such as otitis media and otitis externa.
      This partial list here is from the link below:
      Acne - Dab on pure or add to warm water and rinse. You can add it to any facial wash you use.

      Athlete's Feet - Being a fungal based problem, Tea Tree Oil does a great job eliminating the problem. Put 2-3 drops in your palm and add a carrier oil or lotion and apply at least once a day.

      Boils - Wash the area surrounding the boil thoroughly and then apply full strength with a cotton swab two to four times each day for four days. A gauze pad saturated with the oil may also be applied directly to the boil for up to twelve hours.

      Burns - Being a non-greasy and volatile oil, Tea Tree Oil is excellent for burns. Any of the oil which has not been absorbed within 10 minutes will evaporate, allowing the skin to breathe. Speedy treatment is essential. The burn should be put under cold running water or packed in ice for one minute. Then, alternate applications of Tea Tree Oil and cold water for ten more minutes. The oil may be poured from the bottle directly over the burn. The oil can be applied liberally twice daily for three to four days if necessary.

      Cankers (Mouth Ulcers) - Apply the oil full strength directly to the canker sore several times until sore heals. One or two applications are reported to do the trick for most people.

      Cold Sores - Apply the oil full strength daily for a week.

      Cuts - Clean the wound and apply the Tea Tree Oil directly to the cut two to three times the first day. You can continue to apply the oil twice daily for up to seven days thereafter.

      Ear Aches - Rub two or three drops of the oil on the outer ear or dilute three drops of the oil in one teaspoon of olive oil and put a few drops of the diluted mixture in the ear twice daily.

      Fungus Nails - clear up fungal infections of both toenails and fingernails even if they are resistant to strong systemic antibiotics.

      Gums/Teeth - Add 2 drops to a little water and swish around mouth --- or add a drop to your toothbrush and apply while you brush. Does a great job for receding gums, pyorrhea, gingivitis, plaque, and bad breath from dental sources.

      Infected/Sore Nails - Applied several times a day.

      Insect Bites and Stings - As soon as possible, apply the oil full strength directly to the bite with a finger or cotton ball.

      Pimples - Apply full strength with a cotton swab two to four times each day for four days.

      Sinus & Bronchial Congestion - Rub a few drops of the oil on the nose and sinuses and/or rub the oil on the chest. The vapors may be inhaled by adding five drops of the oil to a bowl of steaming hot water or to a vaporizor.

      Skin Problems - Use one teaspoon in a tub of bath water for a very invigorating bath. It is reported to help sooth and disinfect the skin in cases of psoriasis, eczema and so forth.

      Sunburn - Dilute one part Tea Tree Oil with ten parts of olive oil or coconut oil and spread freely over the affected areas. This is reported to be soothing and pain-relieving and to reduce blistering and peeling. People have also applied tea tree oil full strength to sunburn.

      Thrush in Infants (Mouth) - Dilute a few drops of tea tree oil in the child's saliva to reduce the strong taste and paint onto the afflicted areas with a swab. This can be repeated twice per day for two days. Discontinue if there is no improvement.

      Vaginal Yeast Infections - Use one teaspoon of the oil in a 500 ml. douche daily. You can also soak a tampon in the oil and insert.

      Good Luck to you!

  14. QUESTION:
    The area around my fingernails/cuticles have bled all day. Any reasons why that would happen?
    Earlier today, the area around my fingernails and below my fingernail bled for hours without stopping. I am not dehydrated, and my skin isn't dry...so why would this happen?
    My skin isn't dry, really, because I use eczema medication on it twice a day, and despite that, my fingers just started bleeding today

    • ANSWER:
      Take a good look at your fingernails and you may notice subtle variations in the texture or color -- a touch of white here, a rosy tinge there, perhaps some rippling or bumps in the surface. These imperfections may not look like much to you, but it s more important than you might think to maintain healthy fingernails. That s because to the trained eye, nails can provide valuable clues about your overall health. And noticing and following up on those clues is the best way to maintain healthy fingernails.
      Tips for Strong, Healthy Fingernails
      To maintain healthy fingernails, avoid infections, and improve nail appearance, try the following tips:

      Keep your nails clean and dry.
      Avoid nail-biting or picking.
      Apply moisturizer to your nails and cuticles every day. Creams with urea, phospholipids, or lactic acid can help prevent cracking.
      File your nails in one direction and round the tip slightly, rather than filing to a point.
      Don't remove the cuticles or clean too deeply under your nails, which can lead to infection.
      Don't dig out ingrown toenails. See a dermatologist if they become bothersome.
      Avoid nail polish removers that contain acetone or formaldehyde.
      Bring your own instruments if you get frequent manicures.
      If you have artificial nails, check regularly for green discoloration (a sign of bacterial infection).
      Eat a balanced diet and take vitamins containing biotin.
      Finally, to maintain your healthy fingernails over time, ask your doctor to take a look at them during your next checkup.

      "Just like the eyes are the window to the soul, so are the nails," says Tamara Lior, MD, a dermatologist with Cleveland Clinic Florida. Lior says she once convinced a patient to have his lungs checked after noticing a bluish tint to his nails, a sign that he wasn't getting enough oxygen. Sure enough, he had fluid in his lungs.

      Warning signs for many other conditions, from hepatitis to heart disease, may also appear when previously healthy fingernails undergo changes, according to Joshua Fox, MD, director of Advanced Dermatology and spokesman for the American Academy of Dermatology. "Changes in the nails can be a sign of a local disease like a fungus infection or a sign of a systemic disease like lupus or anemia," Fox tells WebMD.

      He says he sometimes tries to guess if a person has anemia by looking at his or her nails. He explains that pale, whitish nail beds may indicate a low red blood cell count consistent with anemia.

      An iron deficiency can cause the nail bed to be thin and concave and have raised ridges.

      While most of Fox's patients don't come in to report nail problems, he routinely checks patients to make sure they have healthy fingernails. "The nails offer many little clues to what's going on inside you. Lupus patients get quirky, angular blood vessels in their nail folds. Psoriasis starts in the nails up to 10% of the time" and causes splitting and pitting of the nail bed.

      Heart disease can turn the nail beds red. Obsessive-compulsive disorder can show up in the nails through persistent nail-biting or picking, Fox says.

      Even common disorders like thyroid disease can cause abnormalities in the nail beds, producing dry, brittle nails that crack and split easily.

      He lists the following 10 examples of nail changes that could indicate a serious medical condition.
      A Guide to Healthy Fingernails:
      10 Possible Signs of Serious Conditions

      Nail Appearance
      Associated Condition

      White nails
      Liver diseases such as hepatitis

      Yellowish, thickened, slow-growing nails
      Lung diseases such as emphysema

      Yellowish nails with a slight blush at the base
      Diabetes

      Half-white, half-pink nails
      Kidney disease

      Red nail beds
      Heart disease

      Pale or white nail beds
      Anemia

      Pitting or rippling of the nail surface
      Psoriasis or inflammatory arthritis

      "Clubbing," a painless increase in tissue around the ends of the fingers, or inversion of the nail
      Lung diseases

      Irregular red lines at the base of the nail fold
      Lupus or connective tissue disease

      Dark lines beneath the nail
      Melanoma

      'Rarely the First Clue'
      But can a doctor truly detect undiagnosed heart disease or kidney problems by looking at your nails? American College of Physicians spokesman Christine Laine, MD, MPH, says it's not likely. She doesn't dispute the connection between nails and disease, but she cautions, "Nail changes are rarely the first clue of serious illness. In most instances, patients will manifest other signs or symptoms of disease before nail changes become evident. For example, it would be unusual that nail clubbing was the first thing a patient with emphysema noticed. Breathing difficulty probably would have been present already."

      In addition, Laine, who is senior deputy editor of the Annals of Internal Medicine, notes that certain illnesses may cause nail changes in some patients but not in others. "For example, not all people with liver disease develop white nails," Laine tells WebMD. The reverse is true as well -- not everyone with white nails has liver disease. "In the absence of other signs or symptoms of disease, I would be reluctant to launch a complex, expensive work-up for systemic disease solely because of nail findings."

      Fox agrees there is no need to run to the nearest cardiologist if your nail beds turn red. "It could very well be from nail polish," he says. Before assuming the worst, it's important to look at more common explanations, such as bruises, bleeding beneath the nail, and fungal infections. However, it s worthwhile to be vigilant about maintaining healthy fingernails so that you ll be alert to any potential problem.

      When to See a Dermatologist
      When healthy fingernails begin to change color or texture, one of the most common underlying causes is fingernail fungus, which can cause the nails to crack, peel, and change color and texture. These infections often prove difficult to treat and may require professional help, including prescription antifungal medications. Fox says it's best to see a dermatologist if symptoms persist, especially if the nails start to dislodge from the base or you experience pain and swelling.

      Be alert to changes in texture, shape, or color that aren't due to a bruise or fungal infection, including irregular growth, pitting or holes in the nails, dark brown streaks beneath the nail and cuticle, or long-standing warts on the nail bed. Any such color change to previously healthy fingernails is cause for concern. According to Lior, such changes can indicate skin cancer. "Warts around the nails have a tendency to develop into squamous cell cancer," she tells WebMD. "If patients see a dark discoloration involving the cuticle, then we worry about melanoma," the deadliest form of skin cancer.

      Fox advises reporting these types of changes to a specialist as soon as possible. "Dermatologists are well-trained in deciphering between innocuous and serious nail conditions, as well as determining when a change requires further testing."

  15. QUESTION:
    After visiting a wild animal park, i have a skin rash. What could this be?
    The doc thought it was scabies, but the scabicide didn't work, only made the rash worse!

    • ANSWER:
      I worked for a small farm market, mostly repotting plants, but I was around animals too. I got a rash that I couldn't figure out. It turned out to be ringworm, which isn't a worm at all, it's just a fungus. Ask a phamacist which meds to use. My mom said to cover it with fingernail polish, clear, which I did. It went away for me.

  16. QUESTION:
    What are your nails suppose to look like when you are low on iron?

    • ANSWER:
      Nutritional deficiencies may produce the following changes in the nails:

      *Calcium, magnesium and vitamin D are the foundation for nails.

      *Lack of vitamin A , D and calcium causes dryness and brittleness.

      *Protein deficiency may make the nail beds appear white. Protein (free form amino acids) helps aid in building materials for new nails. Free form amino acids are rapidly absorbed and assimilated by the body. Brewer s yeast-contains all the needed nutrients high in protein.

      *Vitamin A and B deficiency causes fragile nails, with horizontal and vertical ridges.

      *Insufficient intake of vitamin B12 leads to excessive dryness, very rounded and curved nail ends, and darkened nails.

      *Lack of protein, folic acid, and vitamin C causes hangnails. White bands are also an indication of protein deficiency.

      *If there are insufficient friendly bacteria (lactobacillus) present in the body, fungus forms under and around nails.

      *Lack of hydrochloric acid (HCI) contributes to splitting nails.

      *Essential fatty acids, aid in the health of skin and nails. They also help to relieve many inflammation problems that occur around the nails. Fatty acids are found in omega fatty acids from fish oil, flax seed oil, and borage seed oil. The fatty acids work well with the amino acid called L-methione.

      *Lack of linoleic acid (an essential fatty acid) may cause the nail to split and flake. If your nails are flaking or brittle give them a boost by increasing your intake of key nutrients. Such as calcium, omega-3, vitamin C and zinc.

      *For fungal or bacterial nail infections, boost immunity by eating garlic and onions, foods rich in zinc (nuts, root vegetables, shellfish) vitamin C and flavonoids (fruits and vegetables), and omega-3 (nuts, seeds, dark green leafy vegetables).

      *Nails that break easy (chip, peel, crack)- may indicate a poor nutrition, insufficient hydrochloric acid, and protein in the diet. As well as deficiency in minerals. increase your vitamin A, by drinking carrot juice. Eat three servings of fish each week and/or consider taking a fish oil supplement.

      *White spots in the nail increase your intake of B vitamins by eating more organic poultry; seafood, and whole grains and vitamin B complex, vitamin B deficiency can also result in fragile nails.

      *For nail problems caused by psoriasis, eat more fish and other foods with essential fatty acids (whole grains, nuts, seeds).

      *Iron-deficiency anemia may cause the nails to appear pale and become thin, brittle, ridged, and easily cracked or broken. Eat more iron rich foods, eat more iron-rich foods such as eggs, liver, green-leafy vegetables, blackstrap molasses, almonds, poultry, whole grain breads and cereals, avocados, beets, dates, lima beans, pumpkins, peaches, pears, prunes, watercress, soybeans, raisins, if changing the way you eat doesn't help, see your health care practitioner

      *Thick, distorted fingernails - can signify a fungal condition: tea tree oil applied externally and taking probiotics (either acidophylis or bifidus capsules from your health food store) may help; the condition could also be due to a vitamin deficiency, make sure you're eating 5-10 fruits and veggies a day and take a daily multivitamin; soak fingers in a mixture of warm pacu d'arco and goldenseal tea for 15 minutes a day; avoid all foods that contain sugar or refined carbohydrates because fungi thrive on them; avoid meat, dairy products, cola drinks, grains, processed foods, and fried greasy foods; apply crushed raw garlic or honey on the nails; take two garlic (Kyolic) capsules 3 times daily with meal to neutralize fungi; take acidophilus as directed on the label to supply the friendly bacteria usually deficient if you have a fungal infection distorted fingernails could also be due to arterial sclerosis, so see your health care conditioner to rule that out.

      *L- Cysteine and L-Methionine (amino acids), supplies the body with sulfur, which contributes to healthy skin, and strong hair and nails.

      *Silicon, (oat straw tea and horsetail), promote strength in the hair, skin, and nails. Silicon is widely available in food.

      *Add Folic acids supplements or folate from natural food source (fruits and vegetables) for healthy nails.

      *Hangnails and ingrown toenails can cause inflammation of the tissue surrounding the nails (i.e., paronychia) and are linked to vitamin C deficiency.

      *Horsetail, this herb helps the body use calcium properly and it is good for the flexibility of the fingernails and toenails.

  17. QUESTION:
    How Do I get rid of Toe Fungus?
    The tip of my nails are always itchy and My toe skin is peeling o.o Plus my toes are so itchy

    • ANSWER:
      Vinegar is a natural antiseptic.
      Soaking the nails in vinegar may be effective in reducing some cases of toenail or fingernail fungus, according to the Mayo Clinic. Although it may not be effective in all cases, the home remedy is inexpensive and may be worth a try. Soak your feet or hands for 15 to 20 minutes in a solution of one part vinegar and two parts warm water once a day. If the vinegar causes skin irritation, add more water to the solution or reduce soaking to three or four times a week

      Trim Nails

      Trim nails short; the lifting of a long nail from its bed can give fungus access to the nail bed. To keep fungus from spreading, keep nails trimmed as close to the nail bed as possible. Do not cut your cuticles, says podiatrist James Graham, D.P.M. Removing the cuticles can create an easy entrance for fungus, which can rapidly spread to the rest of the nail. Wash your hands and the nail scissors or clippers thoroughly with antibacterial soap and water after trimming your nails to keep the fungus from spreading.

      Use a nail brush to exfoliate the skin around the nails, recommends Richard L. Dobson, M.D., professor of dermatology at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. Fungus attaches itself to dead skin cells and will spread rapidly to the nails. Scrub away dead skin cells using antibacterial soap and water each day; then rinse with cool water. Wash the scrub brush after using it to prevent fungus from growing on the brush.

      Tea tree oil can be the best home remedy for nail fungus. It has been rated as a good antiseptic for fungal infections. A mixture of tea tree oil with olive oil (both undiluted) can be applied to the affected area

  18. QUESTION:
    Are there any household products you use for double-duty?
    I use toothpaste to dry up the occasional blemish...
    (Adult breakouts suck! You think you're done, but nooo...)
    And listerine as astrigent in a pinch..
    What do you use ?
    As weird as it sounds, a can of Coke can clean the toilet and it can clean rust too...
    Oh and dryer sheets are good for frizzy hair and flyaways too :)

    • ANSWER:
      I've done the toothpaste thing myself but, I love to use baking soda to scrub stains. Ohh my friend just emailed me tTHINGS TO KNOW

      1. Budweiser beer conditions the hair.

      2. Pam cooking spray will dry finger nail polish.

      3. Cool whip will condition your hair in 15 minutes.

      4. Mayonnaise will KILL LICE, it will also condition your hair.

      5. Elmer's Glue - paint on your face, allow it to dry, peel off and see the dead skin and blackheads if any.

      6. Shiny Hair - use brewed Lipton Tea.

      7. Sunburn - empty a large jar of Nestea into your bath water.

      8. Minor burn - Col! gate or Crest toothpaste.

      9. Burn your tongue? Put sugar on it!

      10. Arthritis? WD-40 Spray and rub in, kill insect stings too.

      11. Bee stings -- meat tenderizer.

      12. Chigger bite - Preparation H.

      13. Puffy eyes - Preparation H.

      14. Paper cut -- crazy glue or chap stick (glue is used instead of sutures at most hospitals).

      15. Stinky feet - Jello!

      16. Athletes feet -- cornstarch.

      17. Fungus on toenails or fingernails - Vicks vapor rub.

      18. Kool aid to clean dishwasher pipes. Just put in the detergent section and run a cycle, it will also clean a toilet. (Wow, and we drink this stuff).

      19. Kool Aid can be used as a dye in paint also Kool Aid in Dannon plain yogurt as a finger paint, your kids will love it and it won't hurt them if they eat it!

      20. Peanut butter -- will get scratches out of CD's! Wipe off with a coffee filter paper.

      21. Sticking bicycle chain - Pam no-stick cooking spray

      22. Pam will also remove paint, and grease from your hands! Keep a can in your garage for your hubby

      23. Peanut butter will remove ink from the face of dolls

      24. When the doll clothes are hard to put on, sprinkle with corn starch and watch them slide on.

      25. Heavy dandruff -- pour on the vinegar!

      26. Body paint - Crisco mixed with food coloring. Heat the Crisco in the microwave, pour in to an empty film container and mix with the food color of your choice!

      27. Tie Dye T-shirt - mix a solution of Kool Aid in a container, tie a rubber band around a section of the T-shirt and soak

      28. Preserving a newspaper clipping -- large bottle of club soda and cup of milk of magnesia, soak for 20 min. and let dry, will last for many years!

      29. A Slinky will hold toast and CD's!

      30. To keep goggles and glasses from fogging, coat with Colgate toothpaste.

      31. Wine stains, pour on the Morton salt and watch it absorb into the salt.

      32. &nb! sp; To remove wax - Take a paper towel and iron it over the wax stain, it will absorb into the towel.

      33. Remove labels off glassware etc. rub with Peanut butter!

      34. Baked on food -- fill container with water, get a Bounce fabric softener and the static from the Bounce dryer sheet will cause the baked on food to adhere to it. Soak overnight. Also; you can use 2 Efferdent tablets, soak overnight!

      35. Crayon on the wall - Colgate toothpaste and brush it!

      36. Dirty grout - Listerine

      37. Stains on clothes - Colgate

      38. Grass stains - Karo Syrup

      39. Grease Stains - Coca Cola, it will also remove grease stains from the driveway overnight. We know it will take corrosion from car batteries!

      40. Fleas in your carpet? 20 Mule Team Borax- sprinkle and let stand for 24 hours. Maybe this will work if you ge! t them back again.

      41. To keep FRESH FLOWERS longer Add a little Clorox, or 2 Bayer
      aspirin, or just use 7-up instead of water.

      42. When you go to buy bread in the grocery store, have you ever wondered which is the freshest, so you "squeeze e" for freshness or softness? Did you know that bread is delivered fresh to the stores five days a week? Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday.
      Each d! ay has a different color twist tie. They are: Monday = Blue, Tuesday = Green, Thursday = Red, Friday = White and Saturday = Yellow. So if today was Thursday, you would want red twist tie; not white which is Fridays (almost a week old)! The colors go alphabetically by color Blue - Green - Red - White - Yellow, Monday through Saturday.
      Very easy to remember. I thought this was interesting. I looked in the grocery store and the bread wrappers DO have different twist ties, and even the ones with the plastic clips have different colors. You learn something new everyday! Enjoy fresh bread when you buy bread with the right color on the day you are shopping.

      his Look>>

  19. QUESTION:
    I have fungus infection on my body since 15yrs.I have visitied dermatologists and applied several creams?
    All gave temporary relief.What should I do?

    • ANSWER:
      Fungal Infection
      What is it?
      A fungal infection is caused by a type of fungus called a dermophyte that infects the top layer of the skin, hair or nails. Fungal infections of the skin are known as ringworm (tinea). There are many types of ringworm, including body ringworm (tinea corporis), jock itch (tinea cruris), athlete s foot (tinea pedis), scalp ringworm (tinea capitis), nail ringworm (tinea unguium), and beard ringworm (tinea barbae), which is rare. In most cases, these infections are not life threatening. However, they may lead to more serious bacterial infections in the elderly and those who have conditions that affect the immune system, such as AIDS.
      Who gets it?
      Anyone can get a fungal infection of the skin. However, jock itch is much more common in males, and scalp ringworm is seen more often in children.
      What causes it?
      Fungal infections such as ringworm are caused by types of fungi that like warm, moist areas of the skin, such as between the toes or fingers, in the groin, and on other parts of the body where there are folds of skin. Ringworm is not caused by a worm. The fungus can be carried by kittens and puppies, combs, brushes, pillows, hats, and towels, and is found in areas that are warm and moist, such as locker rooms and showers.
      What are the symptoms?
      Ringworm of the body looks like a rash that forms one-half to one-inch, ring-shaped, pink or red patches with a clear center. The rash may itch slightly. Jock itch appears around the groin area (but not on the penis) and looks like a red, ring-like rash. Jock itch can be extremely itchy and form small, painful blisters. Athlete s foot appears between the toes as a scaly, itchy rash. It can range from mild irritation to cracking and peeling, making the skin quite sore and more susceptible to bacterial infection. Scalp ringworm may cause round patches of hair loss, broken hair, and/or an itchy, scaly scalp. Scalp ringworm is extremely contagious among children. Nail ringworm is more common on the toenails than fingernails, and makes the nail appear thickened and dull. The infected part of the nail may crumble away from the rest of the nail. Sometimes a fungal infection on one part of the body can cause a rash on another part of the body, which is an allergic reaction to the fungus.
      How is it diagnosed?
      To diagnose a fungal infection, your doctor will examine the affected area and can usually make a diagnosis by appearance. However, he or she may take a sample of the infected skin by swabbing it or scraping off a small piece to study under a microscope. A simple, quick test can determine whether the infection is caused by a dermophyte.
      What is the treatment?
      Fungal infections are treated with an antifungal cream applied to the affected area as directed by your doctor. It is important to keep the affected area clean and dry, and to avoid scratching. Your doctor may recommend a mild hydrocortisone cream to help relieve itching. Males with jock itch should wear loose fitting shorts and avoid using soap on the rash, which may further irritate it. Scalp ringworm may be treated with an oral antifungal medication, as well as a special shampoo. Scalp ringworm is no longer contagious once treatment has begun. In most cases, fungal infections clear up after one to four weeks of treatment, depending upon the location and severity. However, some fungal infections, such as athlete s foot, tend to occur repeatedly. Antibiotics may be prescribed when a fungal infection progresses to a bacterial infection. An allergic reaction to a fungus is usually relieved when the fungal infection is treated.
      Self-care tips
      You can help prevent ringworm by keeping the skin clean and dry, changing socks and underwear each day, and wearing some type of sandal when in public showers or locker rooms. Notify your doctor anytime a rash associated with a fungal infection becomes crusty or oozes.

      This information has been designed as a comprehensive and quick reference guide written by our health care reviewers. The health information written by our authors is intended to be a supplement to the care provided by your physician. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. .
      Wish u A speedy recovery..

  20. QUESTION:
    how do i get my nails to grow longer?
    HELP!

    • ANSWER:
      Long nails tip 1: Don't use your nails as tools.
      Long nails tip 1: Don't use your nails as tools.
      Rather than using your nails use other parts of your hand, or a pen, to perform tasks like dialing the phone. Don't pick, poke or scrape with your nails and especially avoid opening soft drink cans with your nails.

      Long nails tip 2: Wear gloves.
      Detergents are particularly harsh on your nails and can cause splitting and peeling. Wear gloves when washing dishes or cleaning. You should also wear gloves when gardening to protect your nails from infection and prevent dryness, damage, and loss of natural oils.

      Long nails tip 3: Don't bit your nails or pick at your cuticles.
      Aside from the obvious reason of biting shortening your nails these habits can damage the nail bed. Even a minor cut alongside your nail can allow bacteria or fungi to enter the nail bed and cause an infection. Remember your nails grow slowly so an injured nail retains signs of damage for several months.

      Long nails tip 4: Look after your cuticles.
      The cuticle is a barrier that keeps bacteria from the nail matrix, where new cells are generated, so it should not be cut or trimmed. On the other hand you do want to keep cuticles from becoming overgrown, which suffocates nail growth. If your cuticle has grown out on to the nail plate, after sufficiently softening your cuticles in warm water, very gently use a cuticle pusher to push your cuticles back. As well as pushing your cuticles back this will help to remove dead skin and debris that may have accumulated. Hold the cuticle pusher at an angle, and use tiny circular movements, so that you are as gentle and careful as possible and do not damage the cuticle. When you have finished doesn't forget to moisturize your hands.

      Long nails tip 5: Look after your nails.
      Trim fingernails and clean under the nails regularly. Use manicure scissors or clippers and a nail file to smooth nail edges. Never pull off hangnails - doing so almost always results in ripping living tissue. Clip hangnails off, leaving a slight angle outward.

      Long nails tip 6: Caring for brittle nails.
      Trim brittle nails after a bath, or a 15 minute hand soak in bath oil, and then apply a moisturiser. Don't use nail polish remover more than twice a month. Instead, touch up the nail polish. When you do need to use a nail polish remover avoid those that use acetone, which dries out nails. Also consider using a nail strengthener and growth formula.

      Long nails tip 7: The role of diet.
      Unless your diet is deficient in protein and vitamins dietary changes that supposedly strengthen nails won't work. Your nails can however offer telltale signs of dietary problems such as:

      Lack of vitamin A and calcium causing dryness and brittleness.

      Lack of protein, folic acid and vitamin C causing hang nails

      White bands across the nails caused by protein deficiency.

      A lack of sufficient hydrochloric acid causing splitting nails.

      Insufficient intake of vitamin B12 leading to excessive dryness, very rounded and curved ends and darkening of nails.

      Insufficient zinc causing development of white spots on the nails.

      Red skin around your cuticles can be caused by poor metabolism of essential fatty acids.

      If you are concerned that your diet may not be balanced and healthy you should consult a medical or nutritional professional.

      Long nails tip 8: Moisturise your nails.
      Nails need moisture just like your hands do. Rub lotion into your nails when moisturising your hands. Be sure to apply moisturiser each time you wash your hands

      Long nails tip 9: Use coloured nail polish.

      Use coloured nail polish while you are growing your nails. If you prefer a softer look, try a sheer shade. Coloured nail polish helps you become more aware of your hands and how to use them in a way that keeps your nail polish undamaged and hence your nails protected. It also makes chips easier to spot so that you can make immediate repairs.

      Long, beautiful natural nails take commitment and special care to grow and maintain. Be patient, the average nail takes 3 to 6 months to grow.

  21. QUESTION:
    how can you mmake you nails grow?
    im always wearinng fake nails beacause my nails are really short i dont bite them but how do i made them grow?

    • ANSWER:
      Long nails tip 1: Don't use your nails as tools.

      Rather than using your nails use other parts of your hand, or a pen, to perform tasks like dialing the phone. Don't pick, poke or scrape with your nails and especially avoid opening soft drink cans with your nails.

      Long nails tip 2: Wear gloves.

      Detergents are particularly harsh on your nails and can cause splitting and peeling. Wear gloves when washing dishes or cleaning. You should also wear gloves when gardening to protect your nails from infection and prevent dryness, damage, and loss of natural oils.

      Long nails tip 3: Don't bit your nails or pick at your cuticles.

      Aside from the obvious reason of biting shortening your nails these habits can damage the nail bed. Even a minor cut alongside your nail can allow bacteria or fungi to enter the nail bed and cause an infection. Remember your nails grow slowly so an injured nail retains signs of damage for several months.

      Long nails tip 4: Look after your cuticles.

      The cuticle is a barrier that keeps bacteria from the nail matrix, where new cells are generated, so it should not be cut or trimmed. On the other hand you do want to keep cuticles from becoming overgrown, which suffocates nail growth. If your cuticle has grown out on to the nail plate, after sufficiently softening your cuticles in warm water, very gently use a cuticle pusher to push your cuticles back. As well as pushing your cuticles back this will help to remove dead skin and debris that may have accumulated. Hold the cuticle pusher at an angle, and use tiny circular movements, so that you are as gentle and careful as possible and do not damage the cuticle. When you have finished doesn't forget to moisturize your hands.

      Long nails tip 5: Look after your nails.

      Trim fingernails and clean under the nails regularly. Use manicure scissors or clippers and a nail file to smooth nail edges. Never pull off hangnails - doing so almost always results in ripping living tissue. Clip hangnails off, leaving a slight angle outward.

      Long nails tip 6: Caring for brittle nails.

      Trim brittle nails after a bath, or a 15 minute hand soak in bath oil, and then apply a moisturiser. Don't use nail polish remover more than twice a month. Instead, touch up the nail polish. When you do need to use a nail polish remover avoid those that use acetone, which dries out nails. Also consider using a nail strengthener and growth formula.

      Long nails tip 7: The role of diet.

      Unless your diet is deficient in protein and vitamins dietary changes that supposedly strengthen nails won't work. Your nails can however offer telltale signs of dietary problems such as:

      Lack of vitamin A and calcium causing dryness and brittleness.

      Lack of protein, folic acid and vitamin C causing hang nails

      White bands across the nails caused by protein deficiency.

      A lack of sufficient hydrochloric acid causing splitting nails.

      Insufficient intake of vitamin B12 leading to excessive dryness, very rounded and curved ends and darkening of nails.

      Insufficient zinc causing development of white spots on the nails.

      Red skin around your cuticles can be caused by poor metabolism of essential fatty acids.

      If you are concerned that your diet may not be balanced and healthy you should consult a medical or nutritional professional.

      Long nails tip 8: Moisturise your nails.

      Nails need moisture just like your hands do. Rub lotion into your nails when moisturising your hands. Be sure to apply moisturiser each time you wash your hands

      Long nails tip 9: Use coloured nail polish.

      Use coloured nail polish while you are growing your nails. If you prefer a softer look, try a sheer shade. Coloured nail polish helps you become more aware of your hands and how to use them in a way that keeps your nail polish undamaged and hence your nails protected. It also makes chips easier to spot so that you can make immediate repairs.

      Long, beautiful natural nails take commitment and special care to grow and maintain. Be patient, the average nail takes 3 to 6 months to grow.

      Hope I helped ^_^

  22. QUESTION:
    is soriasis is a dangerous disease?
    it is a skin disease.found hairy part in the body.itching is there.

    • ANSWER:
      No Psoriasis is a common skin condition where the skin develops areas that become thick covered with silvery scales. It is a common problem, and millions of people in the United States have psoriasis. The course of psoriasis is quite variable, but in most sufferers it is a chronic problem that continues for years. The presence of psoriasis can cause emotional distress.

      Info on Psoriasis v
      Psoriasis is considered a skin disease, but really it is the result of a disordered immune system. The T-cells, a type of white blood cell, become over-stimulated. They then direct the skin to try and "heal" a non-existent injury. The skin reacts the same way it does when it has a fungus infection; it grows very fast, trying to "grow" the infection off the skin. These areas become the reddened, inflamed, patches with white scale on them.

      There are several ways psoriasis can start. In most sufferers, the tendency to get psoriasis is inherited. It is not passed on in a simple, direct way like hair color, but involves multiple genes. For this reason, it is not always clear from whom one inherited it. Inherited psoriasis usually starts in older childhood or as a young adult. Sometimes, especially in children, a virus or strep throat triggers brief attacks of tiny spots of psoriasis.

      In middle-aged older adults, a non-hereditary type of psoriasis can develop. This changes more rapidly than the inherited form, varying in how much skin is involved more unpredictably. Most types of psoriasis show some tendency to come and go, with variable intensity over time.

      Psoriasis flare-ups may be triggered by changes in climate, infections, stress, excess alcohol, a drug-related rash and dry skin. Medications may trigger a flare up weeks to months after starting them. These include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (Indocin, Advil, Feldene, others), blood pressure (beta-blockers such as Tenormin, Inderal), oral steroids such as prednisone, or depression (lithium).

      Psoriasis tends to be worst in those with a disordered immune system for other reasons (cancer, AIDS or autoimmune disease). Psoriasis areas are worsened by scratching and minor skin injuries or irritations. Psoriasis may itch or burn. It most often occurs over the elbows, knees, scalp, lower back, and palms or soles of the feet. The skin may split or crack in areas that bend.

      There are several forms of psoriasis. The most common form shows reddened areas a few inches across covered by silvery scales. Dermatologists refer to the affected areas as areas as "plaques". Other patterns psoriasis can appear in are "inverse" (shiny, red patches in areas of friction such as in the folds of skin in the groin, the armpits or under the breasts), pustular (blisters of noninfectious pus on red skin), or "erythrodermic" (reddening and scaling of most of the skin).

      Psoriasis may also affect some of the joints causing discomfort and restricted motion, and even distortion. This occurs in about 10 percent of people with psoriasis. This is called "psoriatic arthritis". It often affects only a few fingertips, but in some it can be severe and widespread. It also may affect the fingernails, toenails and the mucous membranes lining the genitalia and mouth.

      Treatment is based on the severity of the disease and it's responsiveness to prior treatments. The lowest level of treatment is topical medicine are applied to the skin, the next level involves treatments with ultraviolet light (phototherapy) and finally, taking medicines internally. Treatments from each level are often combined, or switched around every 12 to 24 months to reduce resistance and adverse reactions.

      A treatment that is effective in one person may fail in another. Both trial-and-error and personal preferences often guide treatment. Over time, psoriasis tends to resist its treatments. The locations, size and amount of psoriasis, prior treatments, and the specific form of the disorder are factored into treatment decisions.

  23. QUESTION:
    Question for nutritionists: What are the tell tale signs ...?
    ... that a person is not eating very healthily. When you look at a patient / client, what do you look out for? (for example how should a healthy person's eyes, skin, hair, tongue, etc look?)

    • ANSWER:
      When someone isn't eating well or properly, they will suffer from malnutrition. The signs of malnutrition are:

      General Physical: Eyes unusually bright or dull. Fatigue, dizziness, weight loss and decreased immune response. Irregular cravings. Vitamin and mineral malnutrition is characterized by individual signs and symptoms depending on the vitamin or mineral that is deficient; for example, iron deficiency produces anemia, , hair loss, etc

      Hair: loss, stiff, wiring hair that looks unkempt. Lighter color than normal [pigmentation loss]. Hair can be pulled out with a gentle tug vs hard pull.

      Eyes: The eye lids can be inflamed or swollen and the cornea of the eye, or that clear outer layer over the iris of the eye, can become soft. The inner surfaces of the eye lids can get thicker as well as the outer layer of the eye ball itself. The blueness of the whites of the eyes may disappear. As the symptoms worsen, the thickened outer layers of the eye and inner layers of the eye lid may create a glazed, porcelain-like appearance that can actually hide the small capillaries that are making the eyes red. Holding the eye open and asking the subject to roll their eyes around, you may see what appears like a dull, lusterless or roughened surface on the eyes, created by that thickened layer of outer tissue.

      Face: Angular wrinkles radiating out from the mouth become more pronounced when the mouth is held half open. As malnutrition increases, these lines can turn into scars. The soft skin (it's not really skin but rather a mucous membrane) found inside the mouth can protrude out so it's seen as part of the lips. The lips can be reddened with sores and deep cracks may be found in the corners of the mouth. The small area between the top of the upper lip and the nose can have a definite greasy, yellow scaling that is more easily seen when it's scratched with a fingernail.

      Glands: Check for a swollen thyroid gland just below the Adams apple. This gland, when abnormally large, can be clearly visible in the form of a goiter. There are four Parotid that generate saliva, two glands of them are towards the back of the jaw, one on each side. Malnutritioned people's glands would be enlarged, like the mumps.

      Inside The Mouth: The taste buds cover the top of normal tongues. In cases of malnutrition, the taste buds can disappear. The sides and top of the mouth can appear more red in color and there will often be sores inside the mouth. There can also be white patches of fungus growing on the tongue. This same symptom is also found in advanced AIDS patients and is a sure sign the immune system is shutting down. It can be painful to eat because of all these sores in the mouth.

      Muscles: The muscles waste away. This is because of famine mechanisms built into our makeup tell the body to use up a good percentage of the muscle first as energy before it uses the fat - holding the fat in reserve for really tough times. Aside from the obvious signs of muscle loss, the undue degree of the folding skin on the buttocks or the jelly like feel of the muscles that still remain are also good signs. Of course, the obvious muscular signs of malnutrition are the lack of muscle tone and in progressed cases, the skeletal look of the body.

      Psychological: Unresponsive or disinterested in what' s happening around you. Listlessness, tiredness and apathy may also occur. Dull spirit, possible irritability, and poor memory.

      Skin: Dull, yellow, complexion. Xerosis - a clinical term used to describe dry and crinkled skin that looks worse visibly by moving one piece of skin parallel to the skin next to it. This can be easily done by grabbing an arm or ankle with both hands then twisting each wrist in a different direction. The skin can be tight from excess fluids just under the skin caused by edema. Edema is little bumps, or indentations down to the skin and hides how much the muscle actually has been lost. Skin color loss, including color under fingernails. Follicular Hyperkeratosis which is like goose bumps that don't go away when you're warm.

      Teeth: The teeth can have a lot of decay. There can be paper white areas on the enamel of the tooth ranging from a few specks to the whole tooth. The teeth can also have a brown stain on them accompanied by various degrees of pitting because of decay. In addition, the teeth can have a general corroded appearance. The gums can be red and swollen which would include all the gums, not just a spot or two between teeth. There can also be puss oozing out of the gums from the bone below the gum line. The bones that hold the teeth in place can break down. This bone can become thin and fragile - easily broken, and as a result the teeth can easily come out.

      Obviously, the longer a person is malnourished, the worse their symptoms will be.

  24. QUESTION:
    Is there a fungus or disease (or both) that you can get from not washing your feet?
    My college teacher wanted us to research it for homework. PLEASE HELP!!!

    THANK YOU!!!!

    • ANSWER:
      TOENAIL FUNGUS:

      Toenail Fungus, or onychomycosis, is often ignored because the infection can be present for years without causing any pain. The disease is characterized by a progressive change in a toenail's quality and color, which is often ugly and embarrassing. In reality, the condition is an infection underneath the surface of the nail caused by fungi.

      Check products that the Southernmost Foot & Ankle doctors think can provide you immediate pain relief for Toenail Fungus.

      Immediate Pain Relief

      When the tiny organisms take hold, the nail often becomes darker in color and foul smelling. Debris may collect beneath the nail plate, white marks frequently appear on the nail plate, and the infection is capable of spreading to other toenails, the skin, or even the fingernails. If ignored, the infection can spread and possibly impair one's ability to work or even walk. This happens because the resulting thicker nails are difficult to trim and make walking painful when wearing shoes. Onychomycosis can also be accompanied by a secondary bacterial or yeast infection in or about the nail plate.

      Because it is difficult to avoid contact with microscopic organisms like fungi, the toenails are especially vulnerable around damp areas where people are likely to be walking barefoot, such as swimming pools, locker rooms, and showers, for example. Injury to the nail bed may make it more susceptible to all types of infection, including fungal infection. Those who suffer from chronic diseases, such as diabetes, circulatory problems, or immune-deficiency conditions, are especially prone to fungal nails. Other contributing factors may be a history of athlete's foot and excessive perspiration.

      FUNGAL NAIL INFECTION:

      A dermatophyte foot fungus causes a fungal infection. This infection causes onychomycosis which is commonly known as athlete s foot or foot fungus. The infection turns the toenails or fingernails into a different colour, tears the nail and releases a bad smell. This is accompanied by irritation in the infected area. Wearing shoes and walking could result in serious pain. The infection spreads from the skin of the toe and enters deep inside the nail bed. This results in an infection which causes irritation and pain. The infection is common in adults with more than 90 per cent of cases seen in older people. On the other hand, the infection is rare in children with only 2.6 per cent of the cases seen in children below 18 years of age.

  25. QUESTION:
    i have skin fungus around my fingernails. how do i get rid of it?

    • ANSWER:

  26. QUESTION:
    Why are my finger nails turning black?
    my nails have turn white now turning black is something wrong with me.I'm 13 and weight 200 pounds could that be the reason. i don't eat a lots of fruit most junk food
    is it because i don't eat right or a enought blood not going ti my hand

    ps i not good a spelling things

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like a fungal infection. Talk to your doctor!!

      *********************
      Black Fingernails

      If you have a black fingernail, you may be wondering whether it is caused by a fungal infection under the nail. This may well be the case, however, other things can cause a nail to turn black, so it's important to consider other possibilities and perhaps consult your doctor before jumping to conclusions.

      Fungal infection of fingernails and toenails is called onychomycosis. Only a few species of fungus are capable of invading human hair and nails - they often gain access through a break in the skin or under the nail at the tip of the finger or toe. Because they derive their nutrients from the protein found in human nails and dead skin cells, these fungi do not invade healthy tissue. Instead, they invade the matrix of the nail itself and grow there, causing a black fingernail or toenail.

      Onychomycosis is quite common: more than ten percent of the North American population will experience a fungal nail infection at some time in their lives: it is probably the most common cause of nail abnormalities in the general population, however, there are other causes. A blow to the affected nail is the most obvious alternative. When a nail or the root of a nail is struck so that blood vessels are broken and a bruise forms under the nail, a black area develops that takes a very long time to clear up. Depending on the severity of the bleeding, the whole nail or only part of the nail will be affected. Nails grow very slowly and bruises are similarly slow to disappear even after soreness subsides - a black nail that persists long after the initial injury is no cause for alarm. It will grow out in time.

      Nail injuries are, however, the route of entry for other organism that can either live in and under the nail without causing a problem or set up an infection in exposed tissue. Some species of bacteria are known to colonize spaces in nail beds without causing infection. Some of these bacteria produce color changes, though shades of green are more typical than black. The bacterial colonies can persist for long periods of time without causing noticeable inflammation. Various species of yeast can set up severe and progressive infections of the nail bed and tissues around the nail, however these infections usually do not cause a black fingernail, and are generally severe enough that the need for medical attention is obvious. Yeast infections are, in fact, another form of onychomycosis.

      If you have not suffered a nail injury and your black fingernail is slowly progressing and causing the nail to become thick, deformed, and crumbly, you may have true onychomycosis. Typically, infected nails are white, yellow, brown or black, and variations on these shades may be present. The infection often starts on a toenail and progresses to other toes and fingers, and is very resistant to treatment. If you suspect you have a fungal nail infection, make an appointment with your physician for a proper diagnosis.

  27. QUESTION:
    are prenatal vitamens good for skin as well as fingernails/toenail health?
    i have had yellowish discoloration to both of my big toes off and on throughout the years, would using prenatal vitamens improve the look of my toenails as well as my fingernails? oh will prenatal pills help with health of my skin?

    • ANSWER:
      Is the yellowish color on the actual skin of the toes, or is it on the toenail? If it's on the toenail, then you have nail fungus that can be treated with medications. If it is the skin, then it's very possible that you are forming calluses (areas of thickened skin due to friction/rubbing), which can be yellow colored. To treat that you can moisturize the area often and get a little exfoliating brick (can't remember the name of them- they're like white rocks that you rub on calluses to get rid of them) and use it in the bath tub.

      As far as vitamins go- if you aren't getting enough vitamins in your diet, vitamins could help. You'd be better off making a more concerted effort to eat a variety of colorful fruits and veggies each day (easier said than done, I know). The single thing that you can do to help the overall health of your skin is to drink TONS of water. Most people think they're getting enough, when they really aren't. Soda and coffee don't count as water, they actually dehydrate you more. You can tell if you're drinking enough water when you look at the color of your urine. A well-hydrated person's urine is actually a very very pale yellow, almost clear. The yellower your pee is, the more dehydrated you are. An easy way to get your water in is to buy a big waterbottle and carry it around with you all day, and make sure that you drink 2 of them each day. At least 64 ounces of water daily. That will go a LONG way in improving your skin. That, and stop smoking if you're a smoker. Smoking can cause yellowed skin.

  28. QUESTION:
    What do ridges in the fingernails mean?

    • ANSWER:
      Minor fingernail and toenail problems are common. At one time or another, almost everyone has caught a nail on something, causing it to rip, or has smashed a finger in a door, leaving blood under the nail. These kinds of injuries can be quite painful but are usually not serious. You can often relieve pain and prevent infection of minor nail problems at home.

      Normally, fingernails grow about one-tenth of a millimeter each day. Toenails grow at about one-half or one-third the rate of the fingernails. Aging and diseases that decrease blood flow to the hands and feet may slow nail growth.

      Common nail changes include:

      Splitting, peeling, or brittle nails. These are common problems that develop when your hands are frequently exposed to water, strong soaps, and other chemicals. You may be able to prevent some of these problems if you use lotion and avoid repeatedly putting your hands in water.
      Color changes.
      Little white marks (leukonychia) often appear after minor injuries. They may last for weeks or months and usually go away on their own.
      It is common for a nail to turn black after an injury. The black or purple-black color is caused by blood under the nail and will go away as the injury heals.
      Black, brown, or purple discoloration under a nail that has not been injured may be caused by melanoma.
      Changes in the shape or texture of nails, which may occur for a variety of reasons. Some nail changes, such as the formation of ridges, are normal with aging. Thick, brittle, or dark nails are more common in older adults who have poor circulation.
      Ingrown nails, which are often caused by improper trimming, tight shoes, or heredity. Your nails may grow into the surrounding skin, causing pain, swelling, and infection. In rare cases, an abscess may develop under a nail (subungual abscess).
      Separation from the nail bed. Once your nail separates from its nail bed, for whatever reason, it will not reattach. Nails grow back slowly. It takes about 6 months for fingernails and up to 18 months for toenails to grow back attached to the nail bed.
      Infection and allergic reactions. These are common problems caused by artificial nails.
      Fungal nail infections, which can vary in appearance depending on the type of fungus infecting the nail or the location of the infection. It is not unusual for fungal nail infections to follow athlete's foot infections. For more information, see the topic Fungal Nail Infections.
      Nail problems can also be caused by:

      An injury to a nail.
      Hangnails, which may lead to a minor infection next to your nails (paronychia), causing the skin around the nails to become swollen and tender.
      Nail-biting, which can lead to fingertips that are red and sore and cuticles that bleed. Nail-biting also increases the risk of bacterial infections around your nail beds and in your mouth. Nail-biting can also cause dental problems and infections of the gums.
      Side effects of medications, such as chemotherapy and antimalarial medications.
      Diseases of the skin, such as psoriasis or eczema.
      Skin growths, such as warts, cysts, or moles.
      Other diseases such as Addison's disease, peripheral arterial disease, or HIV infection.

  29. QUESTION:
    how long does ringworm live if it gets outside of a host?
    my whole family has it... we got it from our cat... and we need to know

    • ANSWER:
      Ringworm is a fungus and can be very serious. It can last as long as you can - until you die of old age. If you have a strong immune system, you MIGHT be able to fight it off without drugs, but maybe not before it causes permanent bald spots and permanent damage to fingernails.

      Ringworm can cause your fingernails to become permanently twisted, cracked and gnarled.

      Your whole family, the cat and everything you touch in your home needs to be treated by anti fungal medication. You all need to go to a doctor/veterinarian ASAP!

      If you can't get to a doctor right away, you could try rubbing vaseline or FLUORIDE toothpaste on the sores, and you could try applying over-the-counter anti-fungal medications for "athletes foot", which is a similar kind of fungus.

      You know it is contagious - you all got it from your cat or from each other, so take care around other people. Don't be going over to your friend's house for a sleep over, etc. Don't invite people over.

      YES, RINGWORM CAN SURVIVE OUTSIDE OF A HOST!!!
      Like other fungi, ringworm reproduces by means of spores. Outside of a host, the spores can remain dormant for 6-12 months during which time the spores can reactivate when they come into contact with skin. All clothing, bedding, and other materials that could have come in contact with the skin of an infected person (or cat) must also be washed and treated with an anti-fungal agent.

      There is usually a 1 to 2 week incubation period between exposure and visible infection.

  30. QUESTION:
    What will happen if I go to my doctor for toe fungus?

    • ANSWER:
      It is a living organism that thrives in dark, damp environments such as under and around nails. Fungal infections are very common on both fingernail and toenails. Toenails are more likely to be affected by fungus since it is attracted to a dark and damp environment which is more common on the foot than on the hand. In more severe conditions, affected nails can have a yellowish or brownish discoloration. They may thicken or become brittle over time, and may even shed. Sometimes the nails have crumbling edges. It can be unsightly, disfiguring, embarrassing, and at times, painful.

      The nail itself provides a protective covering that allows the fungus to grow underneath. An accumulation of keratinous debris is usually found beneath the free edge of the infected nail.

      Some people are more susceptible than others, and contract it with mild to severe symptoms. Factors that permit this disease include:

      the abnormal pH level of the skin,
      trauma to the nail,
      poor hygiene of the foot,
      susceptibility (such as decreased immunity) of the person who
      has contact with the fungus.
      Some estimates are that over 10% of the North American population have fungus of the toenails, and it is one of the most common ailments that foot specialists attend to.

      How do I avoid Toenail Fungus?
      Prevention is the best cure!

      Toenail and athlete's foot fungi like to grow in warm, moist areas, which include public areas such as spas, swimming pools, locker rooms, or showers. For short periods of time the it can live in warm puddles on tile floors, awaiting someone to step in and pick up the spores. If you can wear sandals, water shoes, or swimming booties they would help in keeping your feet from touching the floor directly. Some public swimming pool areas have small wade-through pools which help to keep the toenail and athlete's foot fungi in check. After your session at the pool or other public area, wash your feet thoroughly and dry them well.

      Pure 100% cotton, wool, or silk socks are the best to wear because they absorb moisture from your feet (from sweating) and provide good ventilation. When you do get your socks damp, it is a good idea to take them off and dry your feet before putting on a fresh pair of clean, dry, cotton socks.

      Synthetic socks such as nylon are not advised because they don't allow the moisture to pass through away from your skin.

      The best shoes to wear are those that allow plenty of air and moisture exchange. Look for air-breather holes on the sides, natural materials (plastic shoes do not allow air and moisture to pass through), and a comfortable fit. If you have a fungal condition already, sprinkle into your shoes a good anti-bacterial product such as futspa Foot Powder.

      Wearing nail polish is considered to be not a good idea as the polish may encourage fungal growth. The fungus is sealed beneath the toe nails in a dark, moist, warm environment that it loves to grow in. We have heard of a report that a woman couldn't get cured until after she removed her polish.

      Of course, if you know of someone with toenail fungus or any communicable disease for that matter, sharing of towels, washcloths, shoes, or other personal items should definitely be avoided.

      Washing and thoroughly drying your feet really helps. Because toenail fungi likes warm, damp environments, if you keep your feet dry, the fungus will find it hard to survive. When drying your feet, use a towel vigorously to remove dead skin and improve circulation.

      Fungus and bacteria alike flourish in damp environments, so try to keep your feet as dry as possible. To vigorously fight the toenail fungus, take your socks off and go without them as often as you can. Also, it is important to keep your feet and toenails very clean on a daily basis. Use a nail brush to scrub away dirt, dead fungus and nail tissue, paying particular attention to underneath the toenails. Keeping your toenails cut as short as comfortably possible will help keep the fungus in check.

      How do I cure toenail fungus? Are there natural cures?
      Prevention is the best cure. Be aware!

      For some people it can be difficult finding a natural cure to fight the embarrassment, disfigurement and the physical pain of toenail fungus, There are some internal medications available as prescriptions such as itraconazole (Sporonox), fluconazole (Diflucan), griseofulvin (Fulvicin), and terfinabine (Lamisil), but they have been shown to sometimes have side effects such as upset stomach, headaches, and liver damage. Read more at "In the News". Mixing these oral medications with some other drugs can be extremely dangerous. Really! They are very expensive as well, some of them can cost over 0 for just the treatment medications. There is a powerful reason why they are available by prescription only.

      Here's a recent study done that shows there is only about a 35% - 50% complete cure rate after 72 steady weeks of using Lamisil or Sporanox! Toenail fungus study.

      First, try an alternative natural product. futspa Nail Drops are natural, inexpensive, safe and easy to use, and effective. Testimonial Testimonial

      This special futspa toenail fungus solution contains a natural essential oil synergy of tea tree, lavender, and thyme. Tea tree oil is a potent natural antiseptic and fungicide that will help fight your fungus. We are one of the very few companies who tell you the full ingredients.

      How do I use futspaToenail Drops?

      Only one or two drops twice a day at the growing base of the nail helps to restore healthy feet. The handy small bottle has a built in dropper that is easy to use, and the large bottle comes complete with a free dropper bottle.

      It is important to realize that any toenail fungal cure is dependent on continual daily use until the infected tissue is eradicated, and then still more time until complete new toenails are grown. When it appears that the fungus has been beaten, you must continue using futspa Nail Drops (or any other cure) until new nails are in place

  31. QUESTION:
    How do you remove earwax? and what is it?

    • ANSWER:
      Earwax, also known by the medical term cerumen, is a yellowish, waxy substance secreted in the ear canal of humans and many other mammals. It plays an important role in the human ear canal, assisting in cleaning and lubrication, and also provides some protection from bacteria, fungus, and insects. A comprehensive review of the physiology and pathophysiology of cerumen can be found in Roeser and Ballachanda.[1] Excess or impacted cerumen can press against the eardrum and/or occlude the external auditory canal and impair hearing.

      Cleaning
      Cleaning of the ear canal occurs as a result of the "conveyor belt" process of epithelial migration, aided by jaw movement.[6] Cells formed in the centre of the tympanic membrane migrate outwards from the umbo (at a rate equivalent to that of fingernail growth) to the walls of the ear canal, and accelerate towards the entrance of the ear canal. The cerumen in the canal is also carried outwards, taking with it any dirt, dust, and particulate matter that may have gathered in the canal. Jaw movement assists this process by dislodging debris attached to the walls of the ear canal, increasing the likelihood of its extrusion.

      Lubrication
      Lubrication prevents desiccation and itching of the skin within the ear canal (known as asteatosis). The lubricative properties arise from the high lipid content of the sebum produced by the sebaceous glands. In wet-type cerumen at least, these lipids include cholesterol, squalene, and many long-chain fatty acids and alcohols

      Antibacterial and antifungal roles
      While studies conducted up until the 1960s found little evidence supporting an antibacterial role for cerumen,[9] more recent studies have found that cerumen has a bactericidal effect on some strains of bacteria. Cerumen has been found to be effective in reducing the viability of a wide range of bacteria (sometimes by up to 99%), including Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus, and many variants of Escherichia coli.The growth of two fungi commonly present in otomycosis was also significantly inhibited by human cerumen.These antimicrobial properties are due principally to the presence of saturated fatty acids, lysozyme and, especially, to the relatively low pH of cerumen (typically around 6.1 in normal individua

      Removal
      Excessive cerumen may impede the passage of sound in the ear canal, causing conductive hearing loss. It is also estimated to be the cause of 60 - 80% of hearing aid repairs. As mentioned above, movement of the jaw helps the ears' natural cleaning process, so chewing gum and talking can both help. If this is insufficient, the most common method of cerumen removal by general practitioners is syringing (used by 95% of GPs. A curette method is more likely to be used by otologists and ENTs when the ear canal is partially occluded and the material is not adhering to the skin of the ear canal.

  32. QUESTION:
    What is fungus dease on human skin?

    • ANSWER:
      Fungal skin infections are caused by yeasts (Candida sp) or dermatophytes (Epidermophyton, Microsporum, and Trichophyton spp).
      Dermatophytoses are fungal infections of keratin in the skin and nails (nail infection is called tinea unguium). Onychomycosis is fungal infection of the nail plate, nail bed, or both.
      Symptoms and signs vary by site of infection. Diagnosis is by clinical appearance and by examination of skin scraping on potassium hydroxide wet mount. Treatment varies by site but always involves topical or oral antifungal drugs.
      Candidiasis (moniliasis) is skin infection with Candida sp, most commonly Candida albicans. Infections can occur anywhere and are most common in skinfolds and web spaces, on the penis, and around fingernails. Symptoms and signs vary by site. Diagnosis is by clinical appearance and potassium hydroxide wet mount of skin scrapings. Treatment is with drying agents and antifungals.
      Please see the web pages for more details on Ringworm, Dermatophytosis, Candidiasis, Intertrigo and Tinea Versicolor.

  33. QUESTION:
    Fingernail fungus? PLEASE HELP!!!?
    Please help my friend think that he has a fingernail fungus. I did look into it for him and it seem this is what he got. He said that his nail doesn't hurt anymore but the skin around it is very painful.

    Can anyone please recommend over the counter medicine?

    Thanks so much for your time. Have a happy holiday!

    • ANSWER:
      If it's truly a nail fungus the only cure is a prescription medication. If it's more the skin under the nail you might want to try fungi nail or some people have had good luck with tea tree oil. Hopefully one of these will help. :}

  34. QUESTION:
    Is using acrylic nails bad for your nails? Some people say that you may as well burn them off if you do that..
    i dont particularly want to get acrylics at a salon, i just want to know so i dont make a mistake. thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Some people who wear artificial, or acrylic, nails may notice a slight discoloration or coarsening of their natural nails. But a more serious nail problem resulting from acrylic nails is infection.

      Sometimes a gap develops between the acrylic nail and the natural nail for example, if the acrylic nail is bumped or jarred, it may separate from the natural nail. This gap provides a moist, warm environment in which bacteria and fungus can grow. If such an infection occurs, the natural nail may become thickened and discolored and should be evaluated by a dermatologist.

      Rarely, a person may have an allergic reaction (contact dermatitis) to components of acrylic nails or the adhesives used to apply them. This usually results in some redness and peeling of the skin around the nail. If peeling is excessive or persists despite the use of moisturizer on the affected skin, consult a dermatologist.

      The key to preventing infection and nail damage due to artificial nails is to choose a reputable, licensed nail salon.

      Choosing a safe nail salon Questions you should ask
      Is the salon licensed? If the license isn't posted, ask to see it.
      Are the nail technicians licensed? If the licenses aren't posted, ask to see them.
      How are nail implements sanitized? Heat sterilization (autoclaving) is best. But chemical sterilization is also allowed.
      Is there a pre-service scrub? Both the nail technician and the client should wash their hands with antimicrobial soap before nail work begins.
      Is each customer given a fresh bowl of soapy water to soak their nails in and is a new nail file used for each customer?
      Is the facility neat and clean?
      Is there a strong smell of fumes? If there is, it's a sign that the facility is poorly ventilated.

      Adapted from information provided by the Food and Drug Administration (1995)

      MORE ON THIS TOPIC
      Dermatitis/Eczema

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  35. QUESTION:
    Nail care tips please?
    The skin around my nails is extremely dried out and it is also cut. I have tried moisturizing creams and stuff made especially for dry hands, but nothing has worked. This is not my only problem though. Both of my thumbnails and both of my middle fingers grow to the side. They do not grow straight. How can i train my nails to grow the other way? Please give me answers because my hands look hideous because of my fingers and people always ask me what is wrong with my fingers.

    • ANSWER:
      here are tips for your nails
      # Eat a healthy diet rich in calcium, potassium, Vitamin B and iron. Nails are made up of keratin, a hard protein; so adding soy, celery, seafood and dairy products to your diet can help your body produce keratin and aid in nail growth and health.

      # Drink plenty of water to prevent brittle nails.

      # Add more vitamin B to your diet if you notice ridges in your nails

      # Trim your nails often in a squared or rounded shape to prevent breaking and splitting. Use a fine grain file when smoothing the cut edges. Trim your cuticles carefully with a cuticle trimmer at least once a week. After trimming your nails and cuticles, rub your nails gently with lemon, especially if you have brittle nails.

      # Apply a light layer of tea tree oil three times a day to your fingernails if you suffer from nail fungus. Natural tea tree oil is known for its antifungal properties and can penetrate the nail better than other oils, often working faster than prescription medications.

      for your hand follow these steps

      # First, get the gloves and the petroleum jelly ready because once you have the petroleum jelly on your hands you don't want to be fumbling around for the gloves.

      # Put the petroleum jelly on both of your hands wherever you have rough spots. Rub in well.

      # Carefully put on the gloves. This can be messy but is well worth it in the end.

      # Keep the gloves on overnight and wake up to softened hands.

  36. QUESTION:
    Is this a fungus !!!!do you know what it is!!! have you seen it before?curls?
    Around my fingernail hard skin has stared to grow.
    It grows under the edge of the side of the nail and then it hurts and i have to pull it out from under neath the nail
    it curls up under the nail and attaches its self to the nail at the same time

    • ANSWER:
      I have had the same thing since i could remember... if you just file them down it won't bother you. my dad has always had them too, and he did have a fungal infection as well, and lamisil took care of the infection but didn't affect this "thing" at all.

      I believe it is just a part of your nail they call "hangnail" because when you pull on it, it becomes a hangnail.

  37. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know how to get rid of bad smelling hair?PLEASE!?
    My hair doesnt smell after taking a shower, but after a couple of hours it does and i also scratch my head and i get white stuff un under my nails. I know its not lice, but someone told me that it could be a fungus. PLEASE HELP!

    • ANSWER:
      My vote is to use Paul Mitchell or another TEA TREE shampoo (Sally beauty supply has a knockoff of the PM tea tree special products, every bit as good, also many salons have their own version of it.) If you need conditioner, go ahead, there is a companion to the tea tree shampoo, and Mastercuts (a chain salon in our local mall) has tea tree styling gel, don't know about other companion products from other companies.

      I would stick to ONLY the products you need to take care of your hair, and lay off the styling goo for a while, these do tend to accumulate on the hair and scalp. After a while when the situation is back under control, I would say you can go ahead and putty up or whatever you want...as long as you are using a high quality shampoo.

      Tea tree sounds like it is an excellent choice for you because:

      It has a clean minty smell, it doesn't just scent your hair, it has deodorant properties.

      If the residue on your scalp is caused by dandruff, excema, psoriahsis, or almost anything else, tea tree oil will deep clean your scalp and hair...takes the buildup off and medicates a lot of these conditions. Tea tree oil is also an antifungal treatment for anything from yeast infection (in a douche or mouthwash) to topical use on jock itch and athletes foot and ringworm...all in the fungus family. Tea tree is also antibacterial, it will get any germy thing that might be living and pooping in your hair, or causing an infection.

      Be sure to wash your hair every day, or twice a day for a week or two, this is the time you need to knock out a fungus with topical medication in most cases, while you are in the medicating phase, leave the shampoo on a couple minutes for each lathering. Then keep using these products at least every other time you wash your hair to keep the problem under control. Also, every time you shampoo and condition your hair, make sure you rinse VERY WELL.

      I'm very sure tea tree products will help you, my friend!

      ALSO be careful how you treat your scalp with brushes, combs, and your fingernails. You should NEVER scratch your head while messing with your hair, you should work your way vigorously around your scalp the way a cosmetologist does--front to back, sides to back, little pushbroom/vibrating razor motions with the TIPS of your fingers. Use the part of your fingertip that is hitting keys on the QWERTYUIOP row of the keyboard from "home row" ASDFGHJKL:. (The reach puts your fingers at the correct angle to use.)

      The tea tree shampoo doubles as a great shower gel! Its deodorant and antibacterial properties make it a really effective cleanser, esp if you have any little boo boos to keep clean and for those pits and feet. Plus it is an invigorating unisex minty smell. Careful on the private parts, it IS very tingly on the skin and you may not like that too much DOWN THERE, but a quick thorough once over is fine.

  38. QUESTION:
    i have a bad case of jock itch?
    i have had it for a while, i have been using creams like lamesil etc. for a few months its still there, it keeps coming back give me a solution....i hear that anti fungal pills work better??
    i bath 2 times a day, i am quite a clean person...it doesn't seem to be helping.

    • ANSWER:
      Do you mean "Lamisil"?
      Terbinafine is used to treat fungal infections of the toenail and fingernail. Terbinafine is in a class of medications called antifungals. It works by stopping the growth of fungi.
      Tinea cruris (jock itch) is a dermatophyte infection of the groin.
      Reduce your risk of jock itch by taking these steps:
      * Bathe daily. Shower or bathe daily and after exercising, participating in sports or sweating excessively. This helps keep the number of bacteria on your skin in check. Wash your hands often to avoid the spread of infection.
      * Stay dry. Keep your groin area dry. Dry your genital area and inner thighs thoroughly with a clean towel after showering or exercising. Use powder around your groin area to prevent excess moisture.
      * Keep clean. Change your underwear at least once a day or more often if you sweat a lot. Wash workout clothes frequently.
      * Be cool. Don't wear thick clothing for long periods of time in warm, humid weather.
      * Find the correct fit. Make sure your clothes fit correctly, especially underwear, athletic supporters and sports uniforms. Avoid tightfitting clothes, which can rub and chafe your skin, making you more susceptible to jock itch. Try wearing boxer shorts rather than briefs.
      * Don't share personal items. Don't let others use your clothing, towels or other personal items. Refrain from borrowing these items from others as well. Also make sure shared exercise machines are cleaned between uses.
      * Treat athlete's foot. Keep on top of athlete's foot to prevent its spread to the groin.
      Please see the web pages for more details on Jock itch and Terbinafine (generic name) Lamisil (brand name).

  39. QUESTION:
    Some of my fingers seem to have an infection around the fingernails.?
    This started a year ago or so on my right ring finger, I now have it on a few other fingers, it looks like it is dry skin around it but it also looks infected, I have not been concerned until about 2 weeks ago, I have been hydrating it with water and polysporin hydrating cream with bandaids. This seems to help for a few hours after taking the bandaid off but then it comes back, it is slightly painful if it is in contact with anything. Please help, I could not find anything on the internet since I am not sure what this is.

    • ANSWER:
      You could have a nail fungal infection,you need to use tea tree oil every day. It takes a while before it kills the fungus but it does work...............

  40. QUESTION:
    toenails are brittle & discoloured any suggestion or remedies

    • ANSWER:
      Heya,
      This sounds to me like you are describing what they call a fungal nail infection.
      Fungal nail infection (onychomycosis) is very common, particularly in the toenails. It affects around 3percent of people in the UK.
      Around half of all nail problems are due to fungal nail infection. It usually affects adults, and affects more men than women. It also becomes more common as you get older.
      There are several types of fungus that cause nail infections. For example, athlete's foot is a fungal skin infection of the toes, which easily spreads to the toenails. Candida is a yeast which can cause an infection of the skin around the nails, usually the fingernails.
      Fungal nail infection usually looks unpleasant, but it does not always cause pain or other symptoms.
      Nail infection can be treated and can usually be cured. But, treatment can take several months.
      Looking after your nails properly can help to keep the infection from returning.
      The two main treatments for fungal nail infections are antifungal tablets and antifungal nail paints.

      Antifungal tablets
      Taking antifungal medication orally (by mouth) means that the treatment reaches your nail via your bloodstream.
      This can be a very effective way of treating fungal infections. But you may have to take the tablets for several months to ensure that the infection has completely gone. Stopping the medication too early can mean that the infection comes back.
      An advantage of the antifungal tablets is that they will clear any associated fungal skin infections, such as athlete's foot, at the same time.

      Antifungal nail paint
      If you prefer not to take antifungal tablets, your GP may suggest you try antifungal nail paint instead.
      Nail paint is not considered to be as effective as the tablets because it has to be painted on to the infected nail and work its way through to the infection. It can be difficult to reach all of the infection.
      A fingernail can need around six months of treatment, and a toenail up to twelve months.

      What i would suggest before any treatment is attempted have a word with your local GP he will run some tests and provide you with the relevant information and treatment needed.
      Hope i helped
      x

  41. QUESTION:
    I'm soo confuse Where does fungus grow?!?
    Does it grow on the nail? Cuz I bought a product and t says not effective on nails or scalp. It says just apply around the nail and nail bed. But I still. Apply it on the nail and on the skin will I still see results ?

    • ANSWER:
      fungi usually live in warm, moist environments, including swimming pools and showers
      Can invade your skin through tiny visible or invisible cuts or through a small separation between your nail and nail bed
      Cause problems only if your nails are continually exposed to warmth and moisture conditions perfect for the growth and spread of fungi

      Toenails vs. fingernails
      Nail fungus occurs more in toenails than in fingernails.

      Toenails often are confined in a dark, warm, moist environment inside your shoes where fungi can thrive.
      Diminished blood circulation to the toes as compared with the fingers makes it harder for your body's immune system to detect and eliminate the infection.

      Nail fungus can be difficult to treat, and repeat infections are common. Over-the-counter antifungal nail creams and ointments are available, but they aren't very effective. If you have athlete's foot as well as nail fungus, you should treat the athlete's foot with topical medication and keep your feet clean and dry.

      Oral medications
      To treat nail fungus, your doctor may prescribe an oral antifungal medication. Studies have shown the most effective treatments to be terbinafine (Lamisil) and itraconazole (Sporanox).

      Your doctor is likely to recommend oral medication if you:

      Have diabetes or other risk factors for cellulitis
      Have a history of cellulitis
      Are experiencing pain or discomfort from your nail infection

      These medications help a new nail grow free of infection, slowly replacing the infected portion of your nail. You typically take these medications for six to 12 weeks, but you won't see the end result of treatment until the nail grows back completely. It may take four months or longer to eliminate an infection. Recurrent infections are possible, especially if you continue to expose your nails to warm, moist conditions.

      Antifungal drugs may cause side effects ranging from skin rashes to liver damage. Doctors may not recommend them for people with liver disease or congestive heart failure or for those taking certain medications.

      Other treatment options
      Your doctor may also suggest these nail fungus treatments:

      Antifungal lacquer. If you have a mild to moderate infection of nail fungus, your doctor may prefer to prescribe an antifungal nail polish called ciclopirox (Penlac). You paint it on your infected nails and surrounding skin once a day. After seven days, you wipe the piled-on layers clean with alcohol and begin fresh applications. Daily use of Penlac for about one year has been shown to help clear up some nail fungal infections.
      Topical medications. Your doctor may also opt for other topical antifungal medications. You may be advised to use these creams with an over-the-counter lotion containing urea to help speed up absorption. Topical medications usually don't cure nail fungus, but they may be used with oral medications. Your doctor may file the surface of your nail (debridement) to lessen the amount of infected nail to treat and possibly make the topical medication more effective.
      Surgery. If your nail infection is severe or extremely painful, your doctor may suggest removing your nail. A new nail will usually grow in its place, though it will come in slowly and may take as long as a year to grow back completely. Sometimes surgery is used in combination with ciclopirox to treat the nail bed.

      Treating nail fungus with a laser or photodynamic therapy intense light irradiates the nail after it's been treated with an acid may also be successful. However, this new treatment may not be available everywhere.

  42. QUESTION:
    Nail not growing along the nail groove?
    So more than a month ago I bruised my middle toenail and I drained the blood out. Sorry for the gross detail. The entire right side detached from the nail bed but I left it alone and now it is except the right side edge of the nail isn't growing along the nail groove, it's just sticking out ... what should I do?
    ( if you don't get what i'm talking about, look at your fingernail, the edges curve into the finger. but the right side of my toenail isn't curved in. )

    • ANSWER:
      Minor fingernail and toenail problems are common. At one time or another, almost everyone has caught a nail on something, causing it to rip, or has smashed a finger in a door, leaving blood under the nail. These kinds of injuries can be quite painful but are usually not serious. You can often relieve pain and prevent infection of minor nail problems at home.

      Normally, fingernails grow about one-tenth of a millimeter each day. Toenails grow at about one-half or one-third the rate of the fingernails. Aging and diseases that decrease blood flow to the hands and feet may slow nail growth.

      Common nail changes include:

      Splitting, peeling, or brittle nails. These are common problems that develop when your hands are frequently exposed to water, strong soaps, and other chemicals. You may be able to prevent some of these problems if you use lotion and avoid repeatedly putting your hands in water.
      Color changes.
      Little white marks (leukonychia) often appear after minor injuries. They may last for weeks or months and usually go away on their own.
      It is common for a nail to turn black after an injury. The black or purple-black color is caused by blood under the nail and will go away as the injury heals.
      Black, brown, or purple discoloration under a nail that has not been injured may be caused by melanoma.
      Changes in the shape or texture of nails, which may occur for a variety of reasons. Some nail changes, such as the formation of ridges, are normal with aging. Thick, brittle, or dark nails are more common in older adults who have poor circulation.
      Ingrown nails, which are often caused by improper trimming, tight shoes, or heredity. Your nails may grow into the surrounding skin, causing pain, swelling, and infection. In rare cases, an abscess may develop under a nail (subungual abscess).
      Separation from the nail bed. Once your nail separates from its nail bed, for whatever reason, it will not reattach. Nails grow back slowly. It takes about 6 months for fingernails and up to 18 months for toenails to grow back attached to the nail bed.
      Infection and allergic reactions. These are common problems caused by artificial nails.
      Fungal nail infections, which can vary in appearance depending on the type of fungus infecting the nail or the location of the infection. It is not unusual for fungal nail infections to follow athlete's foot infections. For more information, see the topic Fungal Nail Infections.
      Nail problems can also be caused by:

      An injury to a nail.
      Hangnails, which may lead to a minor infection next to your nails (paronychia), causing the skin around the nails to become swollen and tender.
      Nail-biting, which can lead to fingertips that are red and sore and cuticles that bleed. Nail-biting also increases the risk of bacterial infections around your nail beds and in your mouth. Nail-biting can also cause dental problems and infections of the gums.
      Side effects of medications, such as chemotherapy and antimalarial medications.
      Diseases of the skin, such as psoriasis or eczema.
      Skin growths, such as warts, cysts, or moles.
      Other diseases such as Addison's disease, peripheral arterial disease, or HIV infection.

  43. QUESTION:
    How can I make my nails look nicer?
    My finger nails currently look and feel like crap. I think that it may either have something to do with the seasons changing or from what I am eating. I don't like Jell-O (which I hear is supposed to keep your nails healthy). I don't mind going to Wal-Mart or Sally's Beauty Supply and buying something cheap. Nothing over . Anyway, the skin around my nails is almost all dead. Over the summer, my nails were really long and pretty. Now, they are about as short as they can be. I don't bite them, I just think that they are getting thinner. I don't know. I really want them longer ASAP. Is there anything that I can use to make them look nice for now (without getting them done by a nail saloon)? What products should I buy? Is it healthy to paint them? What can I use to help the dead skin? How can I keep my finger nails pretty and long?

    Thank you very much :)

    • ANSWER:
      Try rubbing cuticle oil or cream on the skin around your nails every so often during the day, and use hand moisturizer.

      "No nail care product alone can give you healthy nails. But following these simple guidelines can help you keep your nails looking their best:

      * Don't abuse your nails. To prevent nail damage, don't use your fingernails as tools to pick, poke or pry things.
      * Don't bite your nails or pick at your cuticles. These habits can damage the nail bed. Even a minor cut alongside your nail can allow bacteria or fungi to enter and cause an infection (paronychia). Because your nails grow slowly, an injured nail retains signs of an injury for several months.
      * Protect your nails. Wear cotton-lined rubber gloves when using soap and water for prolonged periods or when using harsh chemicals.
      * Perform routine nail maintenance. Trim fingernails and clean under the nails regularly. Use a sharp manicure scissors or clippers and an emery board to smooth nail edges. Never pull off hangnails doing so almost always results in ripping living tissue. Instead clip hangnails off, leaving a slight angle outward.
      * Moisturize your nails frequently. Nails need moisture just like your skin does. Rub lotion into your nails when moisturizing your hands. Be sure to apply a moisturizer each time you wash your hands."

      I also read that eating protein helps, too.

      I keep my nails long by trimming and filing them regularly. Hopefully I helped!

  44. QUESTION:
    help me, it hurts!!?
    what causes the skin along your fingernail to become swollen, red and extremely painful? and how do you make the pain go away? thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      . It could be 3-4 things. If you put stuff on the fingernail, it might be allergic with your nearby skin.
      "...-- Paronychia is a skin infection around a fingernail that is often caused by tearing a hangnail or cuticle. If the skin is broken, bacteria or fungi can gather and cause a painful infection.

      The University of Michigan Health System says that signs of an infection include redness, swelling, pain and irritation at the site. After a few days, pus or other discharge may seep from the wound.
      Bacterial infections are treated with an antibiotic, while fungal infections are treated with an anti-fungal cream. "
      Check out the WrongDiagnosis site: "...Eosinophil infiltration of the skin, evidence of eosinophil degranulation in the skin, and the presence of blood and bone marrow eosinophilia suggest that the eosinophil is the cause of the clinical manifestations." . Contact dermatitist?
      ....... I'd go see a dermatologist . .NOW .

  45. QUESTION:
    Fingernail fungus & small brown circles under skin?
    Well about a year and half ago around Halloween 07' I went camping. I came home and I want to say about a week later I had 2 little pus bubbles next to my middle finger nail. I put cortizone on it figuring it was just poison ivy and it would just go away. Well the pus bubbles went away but my skin started to peel and my finger nail was really discolored.

    Now since then it the peeling skin has progressed all the way down to my palm and all my fingernails look messed up, not as bad as the middle finger but they're bulky and embarrassing. Also I keep seeing little brown circles under my skin and I'm not sure if that's the fungus itself or what.. any input is much appreciated I just want my hand/fingernails to look normal again..

    here is a picture to help you get the idea, not pretty so click at your own risk :x
    http://img169.imageshack.us/i/img00227.jpg/

    • ANSWER:
      you definitely need to get rid of fungus!

      for me worked very well ZetaClear! I think it is the fastest way to get rid of fungus! Nail fungus is tough to treat. The extracts in Zetaclear provide the most powerful therapeutic effect for healthy looking nails.

      Obviously, you can't spray herbicide on your feet or hands! The next best thing is Zetaclear. It's made from all-natural homeopathic ingredients. This product works time after time and results are guaranteed. This extra strength solution is designed to be as aggressive and strong as possible, without causing irritation.

      It worked fast and still works for me!

      I do not know if any pharmacies carry ZetaClear but I do know that you should purchase it directly from the manufacturer and read more about the product here http://www.zetaclear.com/?aid=749165

  46. QUESTION:
    cuticle care...Sore red fingers where cuticle meets nail...HELP?
    So i use lotion like crazy and always have, but lately the cuticles have been all pushed back...not stuck on the nail like normal. my skin is all red and sore where the cuticle is supposed to connect to my nail. it hurts so bad!. Is is a vitamin deffeicency? What can i do. all fingers hurt...i dont bite, pick or chew.....i need help
    nails are nit infection red...more like just irritated
    nails are not infection red...more like just irritated

    • ANSWER:
      If the skin around your fingernails is also splitting and cracked and you also have cracked lips, sore mouth and tongue and grainy, sandy feeling eyes, then yes it is a vitamin deficiency. Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) to be precise. Sounds diff though, you say all red and sore??? Does this mean swollen and puffy?? And all the same?? This sounds like a nail fungus, really common believe it or not. If its swollen and puffy go to the chemist and ask the pharmacists advice or maybe jus go straight to the Doctor and he can diagnose.

      If its the first symptoms I described go get yourself a really good multivitamin tablet that includes all the B vitamins (B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B12). Don't buy the B vitamins separately as they work best synergistically (as a group).

      Expect to pay around .00AUD , don't buy synthetic vitamins (the cheap nasty ones) as they are notoriously hard to digest.

      Also increase your intake of foods rich in B2 - liver, kidneys, cheese, leafy green vegies, fish, eggs, yoghurt and beans.

      PEACE & LIGHT 2 U

  47. QUESTION:
    how to hide toenail fungus?
    Omg im 16 and ever since i was about 10 ive had toenail fungus on one of my big toes. it is so embarrassing and i never want to take my socks off...its summer now and who wants to cover their feet up all day when its hot. i try to cover it up sometimes with nail polish and it is so hard to take off and it makes it look like a mountain on my toe instead of a toenail. No body knows about this except my mom..i am always crying my eyes out because sometimes that toenail will simply fall off. no pain.. it just falls off..but the thing is , its about to be summer ..what am i gonna do if my big toe has no toenail?? ive been to the doctors plenty of times and they never seems to give me the right medicine. i cant even enjoy just cuddling with my boyfriend cause he thinks its funny to pull my socks off and tickle my feet. Its so embarrasing ..can i get a fake toenail to replace it ??? i just need answers im only 16 and this is stressing me out to the max!

    • ANSWER:
      I fixed my toenail fungus easily with hydrogen peroxide 3 percent. I used a dropper to get the peroxide under the nail, and cleaned it out with a toothpic. It will bubble and fiz alot until it gets clean, do it a few times. This worked faster and better than anything the doctors recommended and cheaper. The doctor told me that the nail would never reattach and would have to grow out taking about a year. but with the hydrogen peroxide the nail reattached and was normal in weeks.
      I don't know how it will work for you, yours sounds more advanced, it might sting a little so add half water to the peroxide, and it is harsh so do it less often if need be. You don't want to do it so often that the skin is eaten away. But it will knock out the fungus. Once this toe gets better you will probably find it will always be a bit fungusy, so keep cleaning with the peroxide a few times per week and clean your fingernails too to prevent problems there. You can soak it in baking soda and warm water, and put eucalyptus or teatree oil on it. Also you can see a naturopath for a herbal medicine to knock out fungus from the inside. Fungus is everywhere and you need to knock it out so the nail can regrow, the fungus will eat the toenail, leaving white goo that you clean out with the toothpic and peroxide.
      Often there is a trauma like dropping something on your toe, an insect bite or too tight shoes that damage the toe letting the fungus thrive. If something happened to your toe like this then this makes it easier to explain to people, it's a cool story, nothing to be embarrased about, nobody is perfect.
      I know it's ugly but it's only your toe and most people don't see it. Ballerinas have mutilated toes, fungus and missing toenails from too tight shoes, and standing on their toes, but everybody still thinks they are beautiful.
      The only way to hide it is a bandaid, but don't do this too often or it will make it moist so the fungus gets worse. Make sure your shoes are not too tight around your toes. It can grow back and look normal with the right treatment.

  48. QUESTION:
    Do I have a fingernail funghal infection?
    A few weeks ago my acrylic nail snapped off and my nail underneath it partly came off with it.. I left it to grow for a week or two then I got another set of acrylics on. My nail was. Then quite far away from my skin so it was easy for dirt to get right underneath it. When I went to the nail salon yesterday the nail technician saw what i thought was just dirt underneath my nail and said it looks like a funghi infection and that I would need to go to the chemist and get some treatment. Tonight I got the 'dirt' out from under my nail with a fine nail tool and the nail no longer looks like it has anything wrong with it. What I want to know is what does a finger nail funghi infection look like? And could mine just have been dirt? Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Nail fungus makes nails yellow or green sometimes purple. It could only underneath the nail or in the surface. Surface becomes rough and the nails peel more easily. Underneath you can see layers of white or yellow ''dirt''. Most the times this dirt can be easily removed.

      It's easy to miss diagnose and confuse a chipped nail after acrylics are off to nail fungus. A nail biopsy is needed to identify the fungus.

      You can use Tea Tree Oil directly to the nail with a q-tip. Tea tree oil treats the nail fungus and also protects the nail from getting it in the first place. Just apply it around the nail - close to the cuticles - and underneath. 2 times a day max, or once or twice a month as a precaution. It cannot harm the nail even if you don't have fungus. I don't know about the acrylics though. You should ask at the salon for that.

  49. QUESTION:
    I have the beginnings of fingernail fungus, how do I treat it?
    I've been all over the net this morning, and seen some bad pictures! But I have what I assume is a relatively mild case. It JUST started probably a few months ago, and my nail is all there, and the nailbed has begun to weaken, resulting in what I think is some torn tissue under the tip of my fingernail. I clipped it short, like I was instructed to, and I need to know what to do for a cure. I just put some hydrogen peroxide on it. I'm not quite sure what it did to my finger, but it was painless. Am I doing the right thing? Do I apply this a special way or do I soak it like I have been?
    I especially appreicate -knowledgeable- answers and not simply advice. Personal experience is highly encouraged. A doctor is currently not an option.
    My nail begun with slight indentations and the occasional white marks. Then began to turn lightly yellowish tan around the edges. The sides of the nail towards the front are beginning to become brittle, but majority of the nailbed is untouched. I've noticed my actual finger seems to look different too, a little redder than usual, and underneith the nail is a white, but doesn't appear to be pus, more like skin coming loose.
    Also, it is NOT verruca vulgaris, the flesh sides of my fingers show almost no change.
    It's a possibility that it could be something else, but it most resembles nail fungus from images and descriptions I've seen.

    • ANSWER:
      Well firstly, you should know that the nail responds in a limited number of ways to bacterial, fungal and viral conditions, so knowing the cause is crucial to treatment. Around 50% of nail diseases are NOT fungal, so you could end up wasting time using anti-fungal treatments, when the real cause is something else.

      I'd need to see the nail, (or at least a description) to make a suggestion as to what the problem is. Even this is limited, because in most cases a chemical test is necessary to discover the real cause.

      You can usually tell a bacterial infection by the gathering of pus around the sides or base of the nail. Viral infections, like verruca vulgaris (quite common) is a real nuisance to treat.

      There are oral anti-fungals you can take, but these are chiefly prescription medicines. Anti-fungals for nail fungus are generally topically applied after removing (part or the entire) nail plate. If you catch a fungal disease early, you might be able to stop it with an OTC anti-fungal.

      You really need to see a doctor, but I don't know your situation.

      {edit} Okay, from what you describe there are a number of possibilities. It sounds like it might be some sort of paronychia with associated onychoschizia or onycohlysis.
      I don't know how red the nail folds are, or if swelling is present, but paronychia might need antibiotic treatment, at the least chlorohexidine or povidone-iodine.
      Onycholysis (the lifting of the nail plate, is caused by among other things, trauma to the nail area or disease. Perhaps even psoriasis, but this would probably be present in all the nails. A solution of 2% acetic acid (vinegar) might help it to subside.
      The onychoschizia is sometimes behind the distal skin peeling and brittle, fracturing nails. This is usually caused by detergents and overexposure to water. The B vitamin Biotin (in small doses of 2.5 mg) has been shown to improve this.

      I know you say a doctor isn't an option, but if bacterial or fungal infection is present, you may have little choice. You should catch it before it spreads or does further damage. If it isn't so bad yet, keep an eye on it.

  50. QUESTION:
    Fingernail torn off accidentally.?
    I was messing around with some friends and I pushed open a window and it slid open really fast and my fingers got caught between the panes and the skin connecting the nail and tissue was torn. The nail is still attached around the cuticle. I want to just pull the nail off and get it over with but someone told me that if the nail came completely off, a new nail wouldn't grow back. Would it be better to simply leave it alone and try to let the tissue reattach itself to the nail (I don't know if that's possible or not), or should i pull it off.

    • ANSWER:
      The finger nail is the protector for the skin under it. If you take it off it will leave that wide open and will be very tender where the nail was. I would tape it in place, just put a band aid on it for a week or two and it will probably be ready to fall off by then. The nail will grow back but if it gets infected or something you can get some ugly disease or fungus in it so keeping it clean is important.

fungus on skin around fingernails

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